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I was recently looking through some open source code PicketLink code. If you take a look at this class, you'll see a number of concrete methods in an abstract class that do nothing. Is there any purpose whatsoever for this?

I thought about two things:

  1. If the method needs to be overriden by subclasses and not defined in the parent abstract class, why not simply make it abstract?
  2. If only some of the child classes actually need to implement the method, wouldn't this indicate the need for a restructuring of the class hierarchy so that children are not forced to have methods that are not applicable?
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

While not the most common case, sometimes it is handy in the context of a template method. In this case there is a method that defines the flow, leaving the concrete implementation of some parts to its subclasses. In some cases a default concrete behavior is to do nothing, leaving the concrete method in the base class empty, but allowing customization in the subclass by overriding it.

HTH

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Personally I think it is a code smell.

Like you say, unless they have some base functionality - which they don't, they should be abstract, forcing derived classes to provide implementation.

If some derived classes shouldn't have an implementation for these methods, then there's probably something wrong with the design.

Consider this:

public abstract class Animal
{
    public abstract string Speak();
}

public class Dog : Animal
{
    public override string Speak()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Woof");
    }
}

public class Cat : Animal
{
    public override string Speak()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Meow");
    }
}

All fine so far, but what if you want to add an animal that doesn't speak?

public class Ant : Animal
{
    public override string Speak()
    {
        // do nothing - ants don't speak.
    }
}

This in my opinion is bad. Someone might do this (what you have described).

public abstract class Animal
{
    public string Speak()
    {
        // not abstract because not all derived animals speak.
    }
}

This in my opinion, is better, but still not great. What I would like to see in this situation is either Speak be moved to an interface and only the animals that can speak implement it, or something like this.

public abstract class Animal
{
}

public abstract class Mammal : Animal
{
    public abstract string Speak();
}

public class Dog : Mammal
{
    public override string Speak()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Woof");
    }
}

public class Cat : Mammal
{
    public override string Speak()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Meow");
    }
}

public class Ant : Animal
{
}
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Leaving methods empty in super classes bothers me as well. However, I think I'd have to accept this idea as legitimate and agree with Andrés Fortier's answer. E. g.: What if I had a class that holds a collection of Animal and I'd like to execute some methods on them, Speak() being one of them, if the corresponding Animal would be a Mammal. Does this mean I'd have to use an instanceof or would I have to hold a redundant collection with Mammals? I don't like both of these ideas and would stay with the empty Speak()-method in the Animal class. –  Torsten Aug 29 '13 at 7:12
    
ISpeak interface would be the way to go then. –  PeteGO Aug 29 '13 at 16:17
    
This fails, if the methods I'd like to execute are among Animal's definition and does not only consist of the speak()-method. Say there's an eat()-method. I want to execute eat and speak. I then have to choose one of the constructs I mentioned before. –  Torsten Sep 5 '13 at 7:39
    
The methods that you want to execute should be extractable into an interface. Eat and speak aren't really related so it's not a great example, but something like Walk(), Run(), Hop(), Skip(), etc could be extracted into an interface like IHasLegs for example. Your collection that you would be operating on would be something like List<IHasLegs>. If the operations that you are doing to this list are not related, then they should be refactored out into a separate method or class. –  PeteGO Sep 5 '13 at 12:04
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Building off of Andres Fortier's answer, you will also see this pattern a lot in Swing, with the various EventListener Adapter classes. For example, MouseAdapter provides corresponding empty methods for each listener method. This allows the interface to define all relevant methods, but implementations to extend the corresponding adapter and only override a single method they care about, instead of being forced to provide empty bodies for all other interface methods.

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Good one, forgot about default interface implementations. +1. –  Andrés Fortier Dec 7 '12 at 22:40
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