Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have a piece of code where is something like this happening

     type<X> function( args<x> g)
     {
        ...
        function2();
        .....
     } 

now X can be of two types say type1 and type2. i want to write the function as type function( args g) { ...

        if X is of type1 then call function2();
        if X is of type2 then call function3();
        .....
     }

how can i achieve this. i am wrting in C++ and developing in visual studio.

thanks

share|improve this question
1  
What kind of language is this? And where is the #define? –  JohnB Dec 7 '12 at 20:55
    
@JohnB C-style pseudo-code, probably. –  milleniumbug Dec 7 '12 at 20:56
    
I smell template specialization –  gvd Dec 7 '12 at 20:58
    
Wouldn't real code be better? –  JohnB Dec 7 '12 at 21:00
    
What does this have to do with #define? Why did you mention #define in the question title? –  AndreyT Dec 7 '12 at 21:18
add comment

3 Answers

Note: code that compares based on type is usually an indication of a poor design.

You could use one function that has different signatures:

void my_function(const type_1& t1);
void my_function(const type_2& t2);

Let the compiler choose the function base on the parameter type.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm assuming that X is a class? You should use virtual functions and created a derived version of X. See below example:

class X
{
public:
    virtual void myFunction(int input) { // do stuff here... }
};

class Y : public X
{
public:
    void myFunction(int input) { // do overridden stuff here... }
};

Then, if you create an object of type X and call myFunction() on it, then it will run the "do stuff here" code. If you create an object of type Y and call myFunction() on it, then it will run the "do overridden stuff here" code instead. But you can use whatever object you create in a polymorphic fashion, like so:

X *obj = NULL;

if (condition met)
{
    obj = new X();
}
else
{
    obj = new Y();
}

obj->myFunction(myInput); // will call either X or Y's myFunction() depending on what type it is
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use either template specialization or function overload. For example:

template <class X>
int foo(std::vector<X> a)
{
  foo1(); 
}

template <>
int foo<int>(std::vector<int> a)
{
  foo2(); 
}

Note, if you need to specialize your function only for a few types, it is better to use function overload. If you have a lot of similar code, and the only difference is in 1 function call, one might use typeid:

if (typeid(X) == typeid(type1)) {
  function2()
} else if (typeid(X) == typeid(type2)) {
  function3()
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.