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I have a function which does some maths on two numbers but i seem to get NaN as a return for it.... I don't know why though..... this is my function:

function mouseConvert(mousex,mousey){

 console.log(mousex+ ' '+ mousey);

    var x = (mousex + Data.offset_x) - (settings.width/2) - settings.offset_left;
    var y = (mousey + Data.offset_y) - settings.offset_top;
    var tx = Math.round((x + y * 2) / settings.grid) - 1;
    var ty = Math.round((y * 2 - x) / settings.grid) - 1;

 console.log(tx+ ' '+ ty);

return [tx,ty];
} 

The console log output from the function shows:

enter image description here

Here is the value for Data and settings

enter image description here

Why is it not returning numbers but rather NaN ?

share|improve this question
    
Using a debugger you can know what are the values of all the variables where the calculus is done. –  Denys Séguret Dec 7 '12 at 21:10
    
You mean console.log ? I added a second picture showing the input values.... and the result. –  Dave Dec 7 '12 at 21:10
    
Show me the logging code for the second statement –  Jan Dvorak Dec 7 '12 at 21:10
    
What do you mean "logging code"? –  Dave Dec 7 '12 at 21:11
2  
Try logging JSON.stringify(Data) right before using the properties. The Chrome debugger evaluates the object when expanding it, so it may not be actual. –  pimvdb Dec 7 '12 at 21:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well if the mouse positions are strings like "0", consider:

(mousex + Data.offset_x)

Becomes

"0" + -32 //"0-32"

The string "0-32" will then attempted to be converted to a number when you do subtraction with - (settings.width/2). And Number("0-32") is NaN, after which everything becomes NaN.

You should convert them to a number right at the beginning. Or rather, never convert them to strings in the first place, since the event object has them as numbers already...

share|improve this answer

U have to convert mouseX and mouseY to int or float parseInt or parseFloat

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<script>
var Data = { ipos: NaN, jpos: NaN, level: "1", money: "1000", offset_x: -32, offset_y: -250};
var settings = { grid: 64, height: 500, offset_left: 258, offset_top: 85, width: 1165};

function mouseConvert(mousex,mousey){
 mousex = parseInt(mousex);
 mousey = parseInt(mousey); 
console.log(mousex+ ' '+ mousey);

    var x = (mousex + Data.offset_x) - (settings.width/2) - settings.offset_left;
    var y = (mousey + Data.offset_y) - settings.offset_top;
    var tx = Math.round((x + y * 2) / settings.grid) - 1;
    var ty = Math.round((y * 2 - x) / settings.grid) - 1;

 console.log(tx+ ' '+ ty);

return [tx,ty];
}
mouseConvert('0', 1);
</script> 
</body>
</html>

return

0 1 
-25 2 

without parseInt it will return Nan

share|improve this answer
    
Can a mouse position be a float? or does it snap to integer location ? –  Dave Dec 7 '12 at 21:17
    
mouse position will always be an int. There is no subpixel mouse positions. –  Mathias Dec 7 '12 at 21:21
    
but if you put mousex = parseInt(mousex); mousey = parseInt(mousey); the code is working –  showi Dec 7 '12 at 21:23

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