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In the case of a thread throwing an exception, how can I wait until all threads that did not throw an exception have finished (so the user doesn't launch again until everything has stopped)?

I use GPars in several different ways, so I need a strategy for each (parallel collections, async closures, and fork/join). The exceptions are not getting buried, they are nicely handled via promises, getChildrenResults, etc., so that's not an issue (thanks to Vaclav Pech's answers). I just need to make sure that the main thread waits until anything that was still running gets to complete or is otherwise stopped.

For instance, when using parallel collections, some threads continue to run, while some never launch after the exception. So it's not easy to tell how many are out there to wait on, or to get a hold of them possibly.

My guess is maybe there's a way to work with the Thread pool (GParsPool in this case). Any suggestions?

Thanks!

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2 Answers

I believe you will need to catch the exception, and then return something other than the expected result (such as a String or null if you are expecting a number for instance), ie;

@Grab('org.codehaus.gpars:gpars:0.12')
import static groovyx.gpars.GParsPool.*

def results = withPool {
  [1,2,3].collectParallel {
    try {
      if( it % 2 == 0 ) {
        throw new RuntimeException( '2 fails' )
      }
      else {
        Thread.sleep( 2000 )
        it
      }
    }
    catch( e ) { e.class.name }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the effort, but you kind of missed the question here, perhaps I wasn't clear enough. I have all this type of exception handling in place. The issue is, back in the main thread, how to make sure that the other threads that did not throw an exception have finished. I'll go back and highlight some things to try and clarify. Thanks. –  user1373467 Dec 8 '12 at 16:27
    
in my example, results will contain integers for the threads that passed, and strings for those that threw an exception. all threads will have finished... –  tim_yates Dec 8 '12 at 16:35
    
Ok, I see where the disconnect is. Let's say you have 1,000 items in the collection to iterate over. If one throws an exception, what normally seems to happen is the group gets interrupted - it stops firing threads, which is want I want, and control returns to the main thread. So not every thread gets fired. However, back in the main thread, there are still threads that got launched before the exception that haven't finished cleaning up. Does that make sense? –  user1373467 Dec 10 '12 at 14:05
    
Now, your suggestion does give me one idea - I could keep a count of how many actually get fired and track how many complete. I was just hoping for something simpler. But I do appreciate it, it was useful +1 –  user1373467 Dec 10 '12 at 14:08
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe I have a solution for the problem, I implemented it in the application after thorough testing and it works.

The withPool closure passes in the created pool (a jsr166y.ForkJoinPool) as the first argument. I can grab that and store it off in a variable (currentPool), to be used later by the main thread, like so:

    GParsPool.withPool { pool ->
        currentPool = pool

When an exception is thrown, and goes back up to the main thread for handling, I can make it wait until everything is finished, something like this:

    } catch (Exception exc) {
        if (currentPool) {
            while (!currentPool.isQuiescent()) {
                Thread.sleep(100)
                println 'waiting for threads to finish'
            }
        }

        println 'all done'
    }

The isQuiescent() seems to be a safe way to make sure there's no more work to be done.

Note that during testing, I also found that exceptions didn't seem to terminate execution of the loop as I originally thought. If I had a list of 500 and did an eachParallel, they all ran regardless if the 1st one through had an error. So I had to terminate the loop by using currentPool.shutdownNow() inside the parallel loop's exception handler. See also: GPars - proper way to terminate a parallel collection early

Here is a complete simplified representation of the actual solution:

void example() {
    jsr166y.ForkJoinPool currentPool

    AtomicInteger threadCounter = new AtomicInteger(0)
    AtomicInteger threadCounterEnd = new AtomicInteger(0)

    AtomicReference<Exception> realException = new AtomicReference<Exception>()

    try {
        GParsPool.withPool { pool ->
            currentPool = pool

            (1..500).eachParallel {
                try {
                    if (threadCounter.incrementAndGet() == 1) {
                        throw new RuntimeException('planet blew up!')
                    }

                    if (realException.get() != null) {
                        // We had an exception already in this eachParallel - quit early
                        return
                    }

                    // Do some long work
                    Integer counter=0
                    (1..1000000).each() {counter++}

                    // Flag if we went all the way through
                    threadCounterEnd.incrementAndGet()
                } catch (Exception exc) {
                    realException.compareAndSet(null, exc)

                    pool.shutdownNow()
                    throw realException
                }
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception exc) {
        // If we used pool.shutdownNow(), we need to look at the real exception.
        // This is needed because pool.shutdownNow() sometimes generates a CancellationException
        // which can cover up the real exception that caused us to do a shutdownNow().
        if (realException.get()) {
            exc = realException.get()
        }

        if (currentPool) {
            while (!currentPool.isQuiescent()) {
                Thread.sleep(100)
                println 'waiting for threads to finish'
            }
        }

        // Do further exception handling here...
        exc.printStackTrace()
    }
}

Going back to my earlier example, if I threw an exception on the 1st time through on a 4-core machine, there were about 5 threads queued up. The shutdownNow() would cut things off after around 20 or so threads had gotten through, so having the 'quit early' check near the top helped those 20 or so quit as soon as possible.

Just posting it here in case it helps somebody else, in return for all the help I've gotten here. Thanks!

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