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I have a css class for a table definition like the following

.tabborder
{
    border:           1px solid black;
    border-collapse:  collapse;
}

And then I want all the th and td elements that are nested within the element that has the class="tabborder" to do the following

.tabborder th, td
{
    border:           1px solid black;
    border-spacing:   0;
}

Having th, td wouldnt work while just th or td works the way I want it to.

Is there a workaround for that. I know that writing seprate definitions like below works But is there an efficient way to do this

 .tabborder th
{
    border:           1px solid black;
    border-spacing:   0;
}

 .tabborder td
{
    border:           1px solid black;
    border-spacing:   0;
}

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The comma is used to group separate selectors.

A comma-separated list of selectors represents the union of all elements selected by each of the individual selectors in the list. (A comma is U+002C.) For example, in CSS when several selectors share the same declarations, they may be grouped into a comma-separated list. White space may appear before and/or after the comma.

Although .tabborder is specified in the first selector, it is not implied in any subsequent selector.

.tabborder th,
.tabborder td /* you must specify .tabborder for each selector */
{
    border:           1px solid black;
    border-spacing:   0;
}

[edit] Alternatively, since a tr can directly contain only td and th elements (source), you may combine the child > and universal * selectors (fiddle):

.tabborder tr > *
{
    border: 1px solid #000000;   
    padding: 3px 6px;
}​
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It worked. –  Shenoy Tinny Dec 7 '12 at 21:39
1  
@ShenoyTinny - Don't forget to mark the answer as accepted. :) –  Shauna Dec 7 '12 at 21:50

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