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I've set up a simple test to test just the word 'Home' after a / in a URL. I have it working without the look aheads/behinds, but would like to use those to do the same thing.

my $page = "/Home"; #should 'match'
#or
$page = "/New Homes"; #should 'no match'

#A
if ($page =~ /Home | Home/) {
    print "no match A";
} else {
    print "match A";
}
print "\n\n";

#B
if ($page =~ /(?<= )Home(?= )/) {
    print "no match B";
} else {
    print "match B";
}

Returns:

no match A
match B #incorrect

So what am I not getting?

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I hope you have use strict and use warnings at the top of your program? –  Borodin Dec 7 '12 at 23:15
    
It looks to me like your #A match is backwards. It is /Home | Home/, which matches "Home" with a blank space just before or after it. Then, your if statement prints "no match A" if there is a match. I think you want your regex to be like /Home\/|\/Home/ (or change the delimiters like m!Home/|/Home!) and make your if/else the other way around. Your #B if statement is also done the same way (but see Nick's answer). –  EvilBob22 Dec 7 '12 at 23:28

3 Answers 3

In your example:

(?<= )Home(?= )

What you are doing here is search for an empty space (or whitespace) before and after home. You want to put your search string inside the parenthesis. To search for the / before home use this:

(?<=\/)Home

Also, just as a note, with the look-aheads and look-behinds, they will not be returned as a match, they are just used to find the match. So in the example above, Home would be returned as a match, not /Home.

Note: As was pointed out in the comments, perl requires the / to be escaped. I edited the code to contain an escaped /.

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You should probably escape the / or note that a different delimiter should be used. –  Martin Büttner Dec 7 '12 at 22:31
    
Unless it has something to do with perl, the / isn't on the list of Special Characters that needs escaped. –  Nick Dec 7 '12 at 23:35
    
It does have something to do with Perl, because (as you can see in the OP's code) regex literals are by default delimited using slashes. So if you don't escape the slash, it ends the regex. Either choose other delimiters or escape the slash ;) –  Martin Büttner Dec 7 '12 at 23:43
    
I see, answer edited to correct. –  Nick Dec 7 '12 at 23:55

I don't know why you think those two patterns are equivalent.

/(?<= )Home(?= )/

matches the same strings as

/ Home /

without including the spaces in the match, and

/Home(?= )|(?<= )Home/

matches the same strings as

/Home | Home/

without including the spaces in the match.


You probably want:

m{(?<![^/])Home(?![^/])}

It's similar to

m{(?<=/)Home(?=/)}

except (?<![^/]) also matches at the beginning of the string, and (?![^/]) also matches at the end of the string.

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Your code is confusing me, and probably you as well.

This

my $page = "\/Home"; #should 'match'
#or
$page = "\/New Homes"; #should 'no match'

is equivalent to

my $page = '/New Homes';

as there is no need to escape a slash in a literal string, and no need to use double quotes unless you need interpolation of variables.

Also this

if ($page =~ /Home | Home/) {
    print "no match A";
} else {
    print "match A";
}

Is printing no match A when there is a match, and vice-versa, so your output of no match A is correct as ' Home' does appear in $page.

The condition you are worried about

if ($page =~ /(?<= )Home(?= )/) {
    print "no match B";
} else {
    print "match B";
}

has the same problem, that it prints no match B when there is a match. It is looking for Home, preceded and followed by a space. $page contains '/New Homes' which has 'Home' preceded, but not followed by a space. So it says match B because there is no match.

Try this variant of your program, correcting the sense of match and no match and adding use strict and use warnings.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $page = '/New Homes';

if ($page =~ /Home | Home/) {
  print 'match A';
}
else {
  print 'no match A';
}

print "\n\n";

if ($page =~ /(?<= )Home(?= )/) {
  print 'match B';
}
else {
  print 'no match B';
}

output

match A

no match B
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