Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been given a task of creating a restful web service with JSON formating using WCF with the below methods using TDD approach which should store the Product as a text file on disk:

CreateProduct(Product product)
GetAProduct(int productId) 


URI Templates:
POST to /MyService/Product
GET to /MyService/Product/{productId}

Creating the service and its web methods are the easy part but

How would you approach this task with TDD? You should create a test before creating the SUT codes.

The rules of unit tests say they should also be independent and repeatable.

I have a number of confusions and issues as below:

1) Should I write my unit tests against the actual service implementation by adding a reference to it or against the urls of the service (in which case I'd have to host and run the service)? Or both?

2) I was thinking one approach could be just creating one test method inside which I create a product, call the CreateProduct() method, then calling the GetAProduct() method and asserting that the product which was sent is the one that I have received. On TearDown() event I just remove the product which was created.

But the issues I have with the above is that

  • It tests more than one feature so it's not really a unit test.
  • It doesn't check whether the data was stored on file correctly
  • Is it TDD?

If I create a separate unit test for each web method then for example for calling GetAProduct() web method, I'd have to put some test data stored physically on the server since it can't rely on the CreateProduct() unit tests. They should be able to run independently.

Please advice.

Thanks,

share|improve this question
5  
Actually getting an URL and parsing the result goes beyond unit testing, in my opinion. Unit tests should operate on the class- and method level of your application, not on the infrastructure. You also want to avoid using the "real" storage for your tests, because then you are testing the database as well, and not only the code that uses the DB. You should read about mocking, there's a lot of information around (for example, on SO) –  Niklas B. Dec 7 '12 at 22:14
1  
Thanks Niklas. What you say makes sense but if I don't test the url, how would I test that a JSON format is accepted by the service for example or the serialization happens correctly? When testing the urls, it has to use the real storage. I'd guess I'd have to write a mixture of unit tests and integration tests? what does TDD say? –  The Light Dec 7 '12 at 22:22
    
I don't see how TDD has anything to do with this. It just says that you should write the tests before the implementation in some iterative process. As for your question, unit tests would ensure that (1) your JSON parser is working correctly (2) that serialization is working correctly (3) your service is transferring the correct data to the underlying layers (which you can check by using stub or mock objects that implement the same interface as your parser/serializer/whatever). You would also test stuff like URL parsing, but as an isolated module. Everything beyond that are integration tests –  Niklas B. Dec 7 '12 at 22:27
1  
... so, with unit tests, you only test isolated components. With integration tests, you test how components work together. –  Niklas B. Dec 7 '12 at 22:28
    
so which test should I be starting with and how? Should I only be writing Unit Tests and not Integration Tests in TDD? –  The Light Dec 8 '12 at 15:31
show 1 more comment

2 Answers 2

Well to answer your question what I would do is to write the test calling the rest service and use something like Rhino Mocks to arrange (i.e setup an expectation for the call), act (actually run the code which calls the unit to be tested and assert that you get back what you expect. You could mock out the expected results of the rest call. An actual test of the rest service from front to back would be an integration test not a unit test.

So to be clearer the unit test you need to write is a test around what actually calls the rest web service in the business logic...

Like this is your proposed implementation (lets pretend this hasn't even been written)

public class SomeClass
    {
        private IWebServiceProxy proxy;
        public SomeClass(IWebServiceProxy proxy)
        {
            this.proxy = proxy;
        }

        public void PostTheProduct()
        {
            proxy.Post("/MyService/Product");
        }

        public void REstGetCall()
        {
            proxy.Get("/MyService/Product/{productId}");
        }
    }

This is one of the tests you might consider writing.

[TestFixture]
    public class TestingOurCalls()
    {
        [Test]
        public Void TestTheProductCall()  
        {    
        var webServiceProxy = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IWebServiceProxy>();
        SomeClass someClass = new SomeClass(webServiceProxy);

        webServiceProxy.Expect(p=>p.Post("/MyService/Product"));

        someClass.PostTheProduct(Arg<string>.Is.Anything());

        webServiceProxy.VerifyAllExpectations();

       }

}

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'd suggest not worrying about the web service end points and focus on behavior of the system. For the sake of this discussion I'll drop all technical jargon and talk about what I see as the core business problem you're trying to solve: Creating a Product Catalog.

In order to do so, start by thinking through what a product catalog does, not the technical details about how to do it. Use that as your starting points for your tests.

public class ProductCatalogTest
{
    [Test]
    public void allowsNewProductsToBeAdded() {}

    [Test]
    public void allowsUpdatesToExistingProducts() {}

    [Test]
    public void allowsFindingSpecificProductsUsingSku () {}
}

I won't go into detail about how to implement the tests and production code here, but this is a starting point. Once you've got the ProductCatalog production class worked out, you can turn your attention to the technical details like making a web service and marshaling your JSON.

I'm not a .NET guy, so this will be largely pseudocode, but it probably winds up looking something like this.

public class ProductCatalogServiceTest
{
   [Test]
   public void acceptsSkuAsParameterOnGetRequest()
   {
       var mockCatalog = new MockProductCatalog(); // Hand rolled mock here.
       var catalogService = new ProductCatalogService(mockCatalog);

       catalogService.find("some-sku-from-url")

       mockCatalog.assertFindWasCalledWith("some-sku-from-url");
   }

   [Test]
   public void returnsJsonFromGetRequest()
   {
       var mockCatalog = new MockProductCatalog(); // Hand rolled mock here.
       mockCatalog.findShouldReturn(new Product("some-sku-from-url"));
       var mockResponse = new MockHttpResponse(); // Hand rolled mock here.

       var catalogService = new ProductCatalogService(mockCatalog, mockResponse);

       catalogService.find("some-sku-from-url")

       mockCatalog.assertWriteWasCalledWith("{ 'sku': 'some-sku-from-url' }");
   }
}

You've now tested end to end, and test drove the whole thing. I personally would test drive the business logic contained in ProductCatalog and likely skip testing the marshaling as it's likely to all be done by frameworks anyway and it takes little code to tie the controllers into the product catalog. Your mileage may vary.

Finally, while test driving the catalog, I would expect the code to be split into multiple classes and mocking comes into play there so they would be unit tested, not a large integration test. Again, that's a topic for another day.

Hope that helps!

Brandon

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.