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I've tried to omit as much code as possible without obscuring the real problem areas. If anyone needs to see the full code, let me know.

So we have built a dead simple TCP application that mitigates database connections, and handles all inbound database requests from a single node. This code handles about 200,000 connections (requests and responses) and then somewhere randomly will hang on the BinaryFormatter.Deserialize method when receiving the request. Does anyone have any ideas as to why this is happening?

There is no exception generated, it just hangs indefinitely.

The server code:

public class TCPServer
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The listener which listens for inbou nd requests.
    /// </summary>
    private TcpListener _tcpListener;

    /// <summary>
    /// The thread the inbound listener operates on.
    /// </summary>
    private Thread _listenerThread;

    private static object       _lockObject = new object();

    public TCPServer()
    {
        _tcpListener = new TcpListener( IPAddress.Any, 19926 );
        _listenerThread = new Thread( new ThreadStart( ListenForClients ) );
        _listenerThread.Start();
        //Get the server's ip so that the server can connect to its own database.
        DAL.ServerIP = GetLocalIP();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Waits for new clients to communicate.  When a new client request is heard,
    /// the connection is given its own processing thread.
    /// </summary>
    private void ListenForClients()
    {
        _tcpListener.Start();

        while( true )
        {
            TcpClient client = _tcpListener.AcceptTcpClient();
            Thread clientThread = new Thread( delegate()
            {
                //Pass in the Current Thread Number so that it can be locked in
                HandleClientComm( client );
            } );
            clientThread.Start();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Handles all of the connections for requests.  After a request is recieved, the
    /// TcpClient is passed to this method in its own thread for processing.  This is
    /// where all of the magic happens.  Here we deserialize the NetworkStream and 
    /// use the resulting object to determine which request the client is making, and
    /// respond appropriately.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="client"></param>
    private void HandleClientComm( object client )
    {
        lock( _lockObject )
        {
            Response response = new Response();
            TcpClient tcpClient = (TcpClient) client;
            try
            {   
                NetworkStream clientStream = tcpClient.GetStream();

                IFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
                object result = formatter.Deserialize( clientStream );

                //Determine which type of request this is
                Response response = new Response();

                //Code Omitted, Determine which type of request, and use that to formulate the response.

                RespondToClient( tcpClient, response );
            }
            catch( Exception e )
            {
                response = new Response();
                response.ErrorMessage = e.ToString();
                RespondToClient( tcpClient, response );
            } 
        }
    }

    private void RespondToClient( TcpClient client, Response response )
    {
        try
        {
            IFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
            NetworkStream stream = client.GetStream();
            formatter.Serialize( stream, response );

            stream.Close();
            client.Close();
        }
        catch( Exception e )
        {
            throw e;
        }
    }
}

The Client Code:

public class TCPClient
{
    public static string ServerIP = "192.168.2.200";

    private static Response RequestTCP<T>(T request)
    {
        try
        {
            TcpClient client = new TcpClient();
            IPEndPoint serverEndPoint = new IPEndPoint( IPAddress.Parse( ServerIP ), 19926 );

            client.Connect( serverEndPoint );
            NetworkStream stream = client.GetStream();
            IFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();

            formatter.Serialize( stream, request );
            Response response = ( Response ) formatter.Deserialize( stream );
            return response;
        }
        catch( Exception e )
        {
            return new Response( "Error with the Response: " + e.ToString() );
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Networks are notoriously unreliable, and a read operation on a zombie connection is very unreliable if no timeout is specified. D you have a read-timeout set on the socket? –  Marc Gravell Dec 7 '12 at 22:15
    
I have not specified one. I will go ahead and implement that. Will you please elaborate on what you mean by "zombie connections"? –  Chuck Russell Dec 7 '12 at 22:39
    
sometimes it is impossible to detect that a network connection is actually dead. All you can do is give up after a while. Depending on the protocol, that might mean multiple failed heartbeats, or simply: no data received after [some duration]. If if you read without timeout from a connection that is actually a zombie, you will be waiting forever: you won't get data and it won't close. Hence: always always use a timeout when fetching from a socket. –  Marc Gravell Dec 8 '12 at 0:36
    
Thanks for the reply! I added the timeout, and then handled the resulting exception in my catch block and that has solved our issue. Thanks! –  Chuck Russell Dec 10 '12 at 15:37

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