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I want to run my function at the first time immediately (without timeout) so I do this:

setInterval(function(){
    alert("Boo");
}(), 1000);

The function executed at first time but in next intervals, nothing happened. Why?

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1  
setInterval takes a function as a parameter. You are passing in undefined. (since you aren't returning anything in the self executing function) –  Shmiddty Dec 7 '12 at 22:18
1  
It's because it is invoked, not passed. If you want an immediate invocation, just give it a name, and return it. setInterval(function foo() { alert("boo"); return foo; }(), 1000); –  I Hate Lazy Dec 7 '12 at 22:23
    
@IHateLazy, could you please post this as answer? –  Afshin Mehrabani Dec 7 '12 at 22:24
1  
@AfshinMehrabani: Done –  I Hate Lazy Dec 7 '12 at 22:25
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The better question is, what are you actually trying to achieve ?

You don't return anything from the self-invoking function, so it will return the undefined value implicitly, which is passed over to setTimeout. After the initial call, the line would look like

setInterval(undefined, 1000); 

which obviously, makes no sense and won't continue calling anything.

You either need to to return another function from your self-invoking function, or just don't use a self-invoking function and just pass over the function reference.


Update:

You updated your question. If you want to run a function "once" on init and after that use it for the interval, you could do something like

setInterval((function() {
    function loop() {
        alert('Boo');
    };

    loop();
    return loop;
}()), 1000);
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jHummel seems to know what the asker actually wants –  Jan Dvorak Dec 7 '12 at 22:20
    
Sorry for bad explanation, please see the question again. –  Afshin Mehrabani Dec 7 '12 at 22:20
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Set interval requires the function reference, not the undefined returned from the function. Just remove the '()' at the end of the anonymous function.

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You are correct. Sorry for my bad explanation, please see the question again. –  Afshin Mehrabani Dec 7 '12 at 22:21
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It's because it is invoked, not passed. If you want an immediate invocation, just give it a name, and return it.

setInterval(function foo() { 
    alert("boo"); 
    return foo; 
}(), 1000);

This is called a named function expression. You should be aware that in most browsers the foo identifier will only be available inside foo, but older IE has issues that causes the identifier to leak to the outer scope.

This is usually not an issue, but you should be aware of it when choosing the function name.

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Because what setInterval "sees" is the return of your self-executing function - undefined.

Try this instead:

    setInterval(function()
        {
             alert("Boo");
             return arguments.callee;

        }(), 1000);

Note:
As I Hate Lazy pointed out arguments.callee isn't permitted in Strict Mode.

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Fairly elegant! –  Shmiddty Dec 7 '12 at 22:25
1  
But it should be noted that arguments.callee isn't permitted in strict mode. –  I Hate Lazy Dec 7 '12 at 22:30
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Here's what I've done in the past as my approach:

(function loop () {
   // do stuff
   window.setTimeout(loop, 1000);
})();
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This approach is also a better approach to setInterval, because it prevents triggering the function more than once per time frame. –  Brian Cray Dec 7 '12 at 22:39
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You self executing function does not return a function to use as argument of setInterval, so it shows alert before the call to setInterval and than setInterval is essentially no-op.

You can see Firefox complaining about empty call to setInterval if you want.

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You could write it like this:

setInterval((function() {
    function boo() {
        alert("boo");
    };
    boo();
    return boo;
})(), 1000);​

But I'd suggest that you declare the function outside of the interval.

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Actually you can name self executing functions, so no need for a function within a function -- see my answer –  Brian Cray Dec 7 '12 at 22:35
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