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Initialize list with same bool value

I'm attempting to make a prime number generator in python 2.7 and plan to use an array (or list) of booleans which will indicate whether a given number is prime.

Let's say I wanted to initialize a list of 5000 booleans, how would I do so without having to manually type ["true", "true""] etc.

Thanks

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marked as duplicate by abarnert, Emil Vikström, Rohit Jain, delnan, DSM Dec 7 '12 at 22:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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See this post - stackoverflow.com/a/13382804/1679863 –  Rohit Jain Dec 7 '12 at 22:26
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Since when is "true" a boolean? –  Niklas B. Dec 7 '12 at 22:29
    
For such a big list, it is probably worth using a Numpy array - np.repeat([True], 5000) uses three orders of magnitude less memory than [True] * 5000. –  lvc Dec 7 '12 at 23:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could try this:

[True] * 5000

Lists can be multiplied in Python (as can strings):

>>> [True] * 3
[True, True, True]
>>> "abc" * 3
'abcabcabc'
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Just as a side note: This works well for lists of primitive types, such as numbers and booleans, but not for lists of objects (or lists of lists, lists or dicts, etc.), as in this case the list will contain 5000 times the same instance. –  tobias_k Dec 7 '12 at 22:44
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Thanks, what I was looking for –  iwin Dec 7 '12 at 22:53
    
thanks, that comes handy –  Kunal Vyas May 2 at 20:17

I'm attempting to make a prime number generator in python 2.7 and plan to use an array (or list) of booleans which will indicate whether a given number is prime.

This sounds really wasteful. A better approach would be to have a set() with only the numbers you need:

>>> primes = {2, 3, 5, 7}
>>> 4 in primes
False
>>> 5 in primes
True
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2  
So you suggest him to manually type {2, 3, 5, 7 ...} instead of [True, True, True ...]. Interesting approach. –  gg.kaspersky Dec 7 '12 at 22:37
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Because there was a downvote I have to say I heartfully agree! The distance between 2 primes becomes increasingly larger, so the bigger you go the more wasteful false elements you have. –  erikb85 Dec 7 '12 at 22:38
    
+1 this would of course be a better approach. –  Rohit Jain Dec 7 '12 at 22:40
    
@gg.kaspersky No I'm giving an example use for a set() (hint: it's a function!). If someone says that they're writing a generator I assume they know it won't come down to calculating them on paper and typing into the program. –  lqc Dec 7 '12 at 22:44
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@lqc, the OP probably wants to implement the Sieve of Eratosthenes algorithm, which is based on that list initialization. You actually suggest him to implement a different algorithm. –  gg.kaspersky Dec 7 '12 at 22:50

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