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Perl sorting hash by values in the hash

I have browsed the web quite a bit for a solution, but I couldn't find the anything that meets my needs.

I have a large list of words with values attached to each word

Example:

my %list = (
  word => 10,
  xword => 15,
  yword => 1
)

The list goes on and on, but I want to be able to return the top 5 hash elements with the highest corresponding values

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marked as duplicate by Brian Roach, Neil, Toon Krijthe, Borodin, bensiu Dec 8 '12 at 3:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

use strict;
use warnings;

sub topN {
  my ($N, %list) = (shift, @_);
  $N = keys %list if $N > keys %list;
  return (sort { $list{$b} <=> $list{$a} } keys %list)[0..$N-1];
}

my %list = ( word => 10, xword => 15, yword => 1, zword => 4);     
print join (",", topN(5, %list)), "\n";

Output:

xword,word,zword,yword
share|improve this answer
    
Erm, isn't this overkill? –  Borodin Dec 7 '12 at 23:51
    
In what sense? Yours is the same :) –  perreal Dec 7 '12 at 23:52
    
so splice copies the list but [0..4] does not? –  perreal Dec 7 '12 at 23:54
    
Your subroutine generalises the problem when that wasn't requested, and it is so long that Perl's inline optimisation won't kick in. splice unnecessarily modifies @list before discarding it. You also unnecessarily modify @_. –  Borodin Dec 7 '12 at 23:59
    
Yours is 600ms faster with around 9s completion time with 1 million elements on my system. –  perreal Dec 8 '12 at 0:09

This does what you need. Note that it will throw Use of uninitialized value warnings if your hash has fewer than five elements and you may have to add code to cater for that. It is also inefficient in that it sorts the entire hash rather than finding only the top five values. Whether or not that is an issue depends on your circumstance.

use strict;
use warnings;

my %list = (
  word => 10,
  xword => 15,
  yword => 1,
);

my @top5 = (sort { $list{$b} <=> $list{$a} } keys %list)[0..4];

print "$_\n" for @top5;

output

xword
word
yword
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+1 Came up with the same, but was concerned about the [0..4] slice being memory-wastfull. Is this incorrect or does it even matter, in this case? –  Kenosis Dec 7 '12 at 23:59
    
@Kenosis: That depends on the size of %list. If the data is huge then the memory may be a concern, but you would want to do a selection sort for the top N items as well, rather than sorting the entire thing. –  Borodin Dec 8 '12 at 0:03
    
Got it. Thank you... –  Kenosis Dec 8 '12 at 0:07
use strict;
use warnings;

my %list = (
   word => 10,
   xword => 15,
   yword => 1,
);

my @top5 = sort { $list{$b} <=> $list{$a} } keys %list;
splice(@top5, 5) if @top5 > 5;

print "$_\n" for @top5;
share|improve this answer
    
Note that if @top5 > 5 can be removed without adding a warning in 5.16+. –  ikegami Dec 8 '12 at 1:49

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