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What happens internally when I mount a file system on UNIX using the following command:

mount -t ext3 /dev/sda1 /home/users

Please give references (articles, books etc.)

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closed as not a real question by frankc, djechlin, DocMax, Rory McCrossan, InfantPro'Aravind' Dec 8 '12 at 9:50

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
OK, let's start with the wikipedia page. –  kush Dec 7 '12 at 23:42
    
@kush: Not enough details... –  Bruce Dec 7 '12 at 23:50
    
any good book on Unix internals should be sufficient, though Google should get you further ahead, and more quickly, than you might get here. –  Greg A. Woods Dec 8 '12 at 1:19
    
@GregA.Woods: Which book do you suggest? –  Bruce Dec 8 '12 at 2:55
1  
The classic reference is Bach's "The Design of the UNIX Operating System". –  Greg A. Woods Dec 8 '12 at 21:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Consider your position: do you want to read this? Can you read this? http://freebsd.active-venture.com/FreeBSD-srctree/newsrc/ufs/ffs/ffs_softdep.c.html

It is McKusick's base code for the ffs file system, which is generally considered the parent of modern UNIX file systems. There is no finer detail than reading source.

The reason I posted: when I taught this stuff long ago, there was a text, and then I presented example code. Students seemed to get a lot out of it... those who actually worked on the material, to be more correct.

In this case the ffs.c code was kind of a defacto model. So it provides a how-we-got-here-from-there.

Now all you need to do is get this: http://www.amazon.com/Linux-Device-Drivers-Jonathan-Corbet/dp/0596005903/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1354930353&sr=1-1&keywords=linux+drivers

Then ultimately download code for ext3. And read it.

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