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I'm trying to call a method of all button objects on every mouse click, but I'm not at all familiar with how javascript prototypes work, would greatly appreciate some help. Here's what I have so far.

var button1 = new button(200, 200, 150, 150, "testFunc();"); 
function button(x,y,width,height, func) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    this.width = width;
    this.height = height;
    this.func = func;

}

button.prototype.click = function(clickx, clicky) {
    eval(this.func)
        console.log("Clicked button at" + this.x + " " + clicky);
        if (clickx > this.x && (clickx + width) < this.x) {
            if (clicky > this.y && (clicky + height) < this.y) {

                this.func(); //Call the button's function
            }
        }   
}

function onClick(x, y) {
    button.prototype.click.call(x, y); 
}

I basically want every button object to check if it was clicked using the xy coordinates of the click. Certainly this should be possible with javascript?

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eval(this.func) wat. eval is evil. –  Alex Wayne Dec 8 '12 at 0:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, a few things.

  1. Constructors should always start with a capital letter. Button not button.
  2. Functions are objects, you can pass one right in, without ever using eval for anything.
  3. If you want to operate on a list of buttons, you need a list of buttons. Functions in the prototype are shared with all instances, but you can't get all instances from a prototype. You need to maintain that list yourself. Arrays are good for lists.

// Constructor! capitalized!
function Button(x, y, width, height, func) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    this.width = width;
    this.height = height;
    this.func = func;
}

// Each constructed Button will have a click() method.
Button.prototype.click = function(clickx, clicky) {
    console.log("Clicked button at" + this.x + " " + clicky);
    if (clickx > this.x && (clickx + width) < this.x) {
        if (clicky > this.y && (clicky + height) < this.y) {
            this.func(); //Call the button's function
        }
    }   
}

// Passed as the function to execute in this not very exciting example.
function testFunc() {
    console.log('called testFunc()!')
}

// Make a bunch of buttons, save them in an array.
// Note how we actually pass a function object as the last argument.
// Note how the last argument IS NOT a string.
var buttons = [
  new Button(100, 100, 150, 150, testFunc),
  new Button(250, 250, 150, 150, testFunc),
  new Button(400, 400, 150, 150, testFunc)
];

// called by something else that passes x and y
function onClick(x, y) {
    // tell each button we had a click, and pass in x and y to see
    // if it should handle it.
    for (var i = 0; i < buttons.length; i++) {
        var button = buttons[i];
        button.click(x, y);
    }
}
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Thank you very much for your assistance! –  Lucas Penney Dec 8 '12 at 1:14

I assume your are coding against the dom.

to get a click your button needs to be a dom element , where is your DOM element defined ? the DOM is the api you need to code against. you cant just magicaly make your random button object listen click events if it doesnt follow the document object model... this has nothing to do with javascript prototypes.

var domElement = document.createElement("DIV")

domElement.onclick = function(event){
 // do some stuffs
  alert("clicked at"+event.pageX+" "+event.pageY);
}

i quote your code :

var button1 = new button(200, 200, 150, 150, "testFunc();"); 
function button(x,y,width,height, func) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    this.width = width;
    this.height = height;
    this.func = func;

}

button.prototype.click = function(clickx, clicky) {
    eval(this.func)
        console.log("Clicked button at" + this.x + " " + clicky);
        if (clickx > this.x && (clickx + width) < this.x) {
            if (clicky > this.y && (clicky + height) < this.y) {

                this.func(); //Call the button's function
            }
        }   
}

function onClick(x, y) {
    button.prototype.click.call(x, y); 
}
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