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I have data in a file, they look this way :

frame_delay
0.000030
0.000028
0.000028
0.000028
0.000028
0.000028
0.000027
0.000027
0.000027
0.000027
0.000028
0.000027
....

I wrote this R script

delays <- read.table("../../data/frame_delay.dat", header=T)
plot(delays)

And get the following chart.

enter image description here

I wonder how to tune my code to get something more readable like this (forget about lines) where y-axis represent above values and x-axis any sequence of number from 1 to whatever.

enter image description here

Thanks for any reply !

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

delays <- read.table("../../data/frame_delay.dat", header=T)
plot(row(delays), delays[, 1], type="l")

enter image description here

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Ok! that sounds better than mine. Now how to change circles to lines ? the line I asked to don't care abour are the dotted one –  Fopa Léon Constantin Dec 8 '12 at 3:16
1  
@FopaLéonConstantin type = "l". Take a careful look at ?plot. –  joran Dec 8 '12 at 3:17
    
@Fopa I editted the answer to show lines. –  bill_080 Dec 8 '12 at 3:19
    
Nice ! that's good, thank you a lot ! –  Fopa Léon Constantin Dec 8 '12 at 3:21
    
Of course this is equivalent to what I had posted earlier, other than the use of rows() (which is a good move). –  Matthew Lundberg Dec 8 '12 at 3:46

Give it an artificial X-axis, such as this (naming your data frame x):

plot(cbind(1:length(x[[1]]), x), xlab='Index')

This does the same thing, perhaps a bit more efficiently:

plot(1:length(x[[1]]),x[[1]], xlab='Index')
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure I understand. Both expressions do seem to print the correct chart (but with points rather than lines), given his example data. –  Matthew Lundberg Dec 8 '12 at 3:02
    
Of course he may want type = "l" but the absence of an abscissa variable is his real problem. –  Matthew Lundberg Dec 8 '12 at 3:05
    
You're right, sorry, I was confused about passing a vector vs a data frame or matrix. But I definitely think they want type = "l". I'm going to delete some of these comments now... –  joran Dec 8 '12 at 3:06

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