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This is my first time using this website so I apologize if I am not using it correctly. Please do let me know.

Anyway I have an Account object that takes in 2 strings... An acctName, and lastName (Code is below).

I want to insert this object into a hash table with the key being the acctName and I would like to use polynomials for reducing collision. I have heard that I must override hashCode() and equal method. I believe I have overridden correctly but I am not sure it is correct because it seems to not be called. Can someone tell me if I am doing this right (Overriding in the right location and adding correctly) and explain to me how to print after an add?

Thanks and looking forward to contributing to the community in the future!

Class---> Account

public class Account
{

 private String acctName;
 private String lastName;

 public Account(String acctName, String lastName)
  {
   this.acctName= acctName;
   this.lastName= lastName
   }

 @Override
public int hashCode() {

    return acctName.hashCode() + lastName.hashCode();

}

@Override
public boolean equals (Object otherObject) {
    if (!(otherObject instanceof Account)) {
        return false;
    }
    if (otherObject == this) {
        return true;
    }

    Account accountHolder = (Account) otherObject;
    return acctName.equals(accountHolder.acctName) && lastName.equals(accountHolder.lastName);
}

Class----> Driver

 public void insertInto()
{
 Hashtable<String,Account> hash=new Hashtable<String,HoldInformation>();
 Account account= new Account ("Deposit", "Jones");
 Account account2= new Account ("Withdraw", "Smith");


 hash.put ("deposit", account);
 hash.put ("Withdraw", account2);

 }

EDIT WITH GETTER INSIDE Account Object

   public String testGetter()
  {

     return acctName.hashCode() + lastName.hashCode();
    }
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5 Answers 5

HashCode of the key field is used for hashing. You are using string as key, and implementing hashcode for you custom class. that's why it is been not called.

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Ah makes sense, my problem is that my Account object takes acctName and lastName into one object. As I said, the acctName is the key. So what could I use for the key field when declaring the hashtable if I have everything I need inside my Account object? –  michael Dec 8 '12 at 3:04
    
Or should I put everything into the Account object instead of the driver? Thanks! –  michael Dec 8 '12 at 3:05
    
add a getter method in your class for which will return ""acctName.hashCode() + lastName.hashCode();"". ANd then use the returned value as the key of the hashtable. –  Debobroto Das Dec 8 '12 at 3:08
    
I will implement that in a moment but then what would the type of object be for declaring the key in the hashtable? Would it be Hashtable<Account,Account>hash= new Hashtable<Account, Account>(); –  michael Dec 8 '12 at 3:10
    
obviously string. –  Debobroto Das Dec 8 '12 at 3:11

You're doing a couple of things that don't do what you think. You are using a String as a key that is unrelated to your object. It doesn't matter that is the same string you want to use as account name (which actually isn't because of your capitalization), but you're also overwriting objects in the Hashmap by using the same key twice (you're hasmap won't store account anymore, only account3).

It looks to me that you want to use a Set instead of a Map.

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Thank you for the reply palako... I will look into mapping but for now can we just ignore I had the same key twice? for learning purposes... assume that it was not the same key. Edit made –  michael Dec 8 '12 at 3:14
    
if you are not going to have acctName duplications and you want to use it as a key for your map, then just do hash.put(account.getAcctName(), account); and you don't need to override equals or hashcode. If you do think you are going to have duplicates, and you don't need the key, keep your equals and hashcode and use a Set, it will do the same thing as the map but without the key and prevents you from having dups. –  palako Dec 8 '12 at 3:16

If you don't have any duplicate account names, then it's perfectly fine to use the name of each Account as the map key.

Your hashCode() method is not called because you're not using Account objects as the key: you're using Strings.

Here is how you would put an account into the map using its accountName:

Account accountOne = new Account("checking", "Smith");
Account accountTwo = new Account("saving", "Jones");

Map<String, Account> accountMap = new HashMap<String, Account>();

accountMap.put(accountOne.getAcctName(), accountOne);
accountMap.put(accountTwo.getAcctName(), accountTwo);

Note that you'll have to implement Account.getAccntName(), which would look like this:

public String getAccttName() {
    return acctName;
}

By the way, it looks like you've done a good job overriding hashCode() and equals().

And... welcome to StackOverflow.

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Thanks jahroy! Just wondering based on your code... is your version still using hashTables... is that like HashMap? –  michael Dec 8 '12 at 3:29
    
Oh yeah... oops. I used HashMap out of habit. The implementation should be identical for Hashtable (they both implement Map). –  jahroy Dec 8 '12 at 3:39
    
No worries Thank you. But my override methods do not seem to be getting called. Any idea why? –  michael Dec 8 '12 at 3:43
    
I only put the "@" on the methods. Am I supposed to put something on the Account class itself? –  michael Dec 8 '12 at 3:44
    
Your hashCode() method is not called because Account is NOT used as a key in your Map. The hashCode() method is used by Maps to keep track of their keys. Because your map uses String objects as its keys, each time a new element is inserted into the Map, the String's hashCode() method (not the Account's) will be used to determine where the element is stored in memory. –  jahroy Dec 8 '12 at 4:10

I have tried the follwinf. But the compiler don't show anything wrong!!!!

package test;

import java.util.Hashtable;

public class Account {
private String acctName;
 private String lastName;

 public Account(String acctName, String lastName)
  {
   this.acctName= acctName;
   this.lastName= lastName;
   }

 @Override
public int hashCode() {

    return acctName.hashCode() + lastName.hashCode();

}

@Override
public boolean equals (Object otherObject) {
    if (!(otherObject instanceof Account)) {
        return false;
    }
    if (otherObject == this) {
        return true;
    }

    Account accountHolder = (Account) otherObject;
    return acctName.equals(accountHolder.acctName) && lastName.equals(accountHolder.lastName);
}

public String testGEtter()
{
    return lastName+","+acctName;
}

public static void mian(String args[])
{
    Hashtable<String , Account> table = new Hashtable<>();
    Account acc= new Account("test1", "test2");
    table.put(acc.testGEtter(), acc);
}

}

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It works for me too... okay final question because I do not want to disturb you anymore... :) How is this code different from mine before (original? The only difference is you used a getter for the key and I hardcoded it. You said at the very beginning the reason the override method was not called is because my key was a string. And the override is still not being called... –  michael Dec 8 '12 at 3:43
    
ok. at first you were calling with this-----"""hash.put ("deposit", account);"" look at the "deposit" string. the string class has its own toHashcode function. So your hashCode implementation inside the Account class will not used for hashing. The toHashcode function of the object used as key is used for hasihing and both the lastname and acctname was not being used for hasing. that was the main difference. But when you call with "" table.put(acc.testGEtter(), acc);""" this--- one combines your both name field and uses that concatenated string a s the key. –  Debobroto Das Dec 8 '12 at 3:47

The hashmap implements the hashCode() implementation to calculate the hashcode from the object to be used as key in the hashmap.

From your code, it seems that you want to map user names to the corresponding accounts. In such a case the hashCode() and equals() overriding is of no use.

Note : hashCode() for an object will only be used if the object is used as a key. In your case, hashCode() of java.lang.String class is being used to insert into Hash map.

  • Conditions for hashCode and equals

    1. Whenever it is invoked on the same object more than once during an execution of a Java application, the hashCode method must consistently return the same integer, provided no information used in equals comparisons on the object is modified. This integer need not remain consistent from one execution of an application to another execution of the same application.

    2. If two objects are equal according to the equals(Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce the same integer result.

    3. Whenever you override the equals() method, youneed to override the hashCode() method as well.

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