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Say I have an array of 3 integers. I want to be able to obtain these results from these arrays using just if statements or a for loop.

[0,1,2] = 0 equal
[0,1,0] = 2 equal
[0,0,0] = 3 equal

This what i have so far and it works, but I think it could be simplified.

int numequal = 0;

if(intarr[0] != null && intarr[1] != null && intarr[0].numequals(intarr[1])) {
    numequal++;
}

if(intarr[0] != null && intarr[2] != null && intarr[0].numequals(intarr[2])) {
    numequal++;
}

if(intarr[1] != null && intarr[2] != null && intarr[1].numequals(intarr[2])) {
    numequal++;
}

if(numequal == 1) {
    numequal = 2;
}

Also, I'm trying to keep it basic. Maybe just for loops. No hash sets or dictionaries.

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1  
You might have noticed that your code only works with arrays of size 3. You should strive to write a reusable method which works for arrays of any size (including 0). A few hints: you'll need a loop (in fact, you'll need a nested loop). –  JimN Dec 8 '12 at 4:03
    
Doesn't look very scalable - what if the array had 1000000 elements? What would your code look like then? –  Bohemian Dec 8 '12 at 4:12
    
I want to do it with just a for loop. –  user1859040 Dec 8 '12 at 4:16
    
Dude, he's learning to program. Let him learn to walk first. –  JimN Dec 8 '12 at 4:16
    
With a for loop, you can iterate over the elements of an array by iterating over an integer index which varies between 0 and "array_size - 1". –  JimN Dec 8 '12 at 4:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are probably looking for really simple solution so I tried to optimize your code a bit:

int[] intarr = {'0','1','2'};
int numequal = 0; 

if(intarr[0] == intarr[1] || intarr[0] == intarr[2] ){
    numequal++;
}
if( intarr[1] == intarr[2]){
    numequal++;
}

if (numequal > 0 ){
    numequal++;
}

if your array is declared as int[] there is no need to check for nulls intarr[1] != null.

If some item is not set, it will be default 0

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you can use Array.sort and count them nicely:

    int[] a = {0,1, 2, 1, 3, 0, 1 };
    int size = 0;
    int counter = 0;
    //sort it and you will get all the equal inters in a sequance.
    Arrays.sort(a);// {0,0,1,1,2,3}
    for(int i = 1; i < a.length; i++){          
        if ( a[i-1] == a[i]){
            counter++;
            if(counter  > size){
                size = counter;
            }
        }else{
            counter = 0;
        }
    }
    return size;
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Start with i = 1 and remove the if(i == 0) –  Cratylus Dec 8 '12 at 11:51

Here is my solution. It is not simple but very efficient. Currently it counts null elements too, which can easily be fixed if it's undesirable.

    Integer[] a = { null, 2, 1, null, 0, 1 };
    Arrays.sort(a, new Comparator<Integer>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(Integer o1, Integer o2) {
            if (o1 == null) {
                return -1;
            }
            if (o2 == null) {
                return 1;
            }
            return o1.compareTo(o2);
        }
    });
    // [null, null, 0, 1, 1, 2]
    int n = 0;
    Integer prev = null;
    Boolean first = null;
    for (Integer e : a) {
        if (first != null && (e == prev || e != null && e.equals(prev))) {
            if (first == Boolean.TRUE) {
                n += 2;
                first = Boolean.FALSE;
            } else {
                n++;
            }
        } else {
            first = Boolean.TRUE;
        }
        prev = e;
    }
    System.out.println(n);
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Seems too complicated to me.Since your comparison function takes null into account why don't you just iterate over the first non null element (O(N)) and then just compare adjacent elements?No need to take corner cases i.e. null into account? Also why are you using Boolean and not boolean? –  Cratylus Dec 8 '12 at 10:27
    
Since it is not a primitive array and nulls are allowed you need that special Comparator otherwise Arrays.sort would fail. Boolean is used because it is also a flag of processing a[0]. –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Dec 8 '12 at 11:55
    
Since it is not a primitive array and nulls are allowed you need that special Comparator otherwise Arrays.sort would fail. What does this have to do with my comment? –  Cratylus Dec 8 '12 at 12:01
    
I mean that Comparator adds compexity to the program –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Dec 8 '12 at 12:06
    
Your comparator puts all null values in the start of the array followed by the actual values. So after sort, just skip over null entries (O(N)) and then start to look for equal adjacent pairs. You will not need any corner cases for this area of the array –  Cratylus Dec 8 '12 at 12:08

This is an algorithm question, which can be optimizez.....

I would use an un-synchronized key-value storage, for the key I would put the int as string, for the value his counts.

Frtst you will try to get it like: hashMap.get("0") if it return null, than the count is 0, than put it back: hashMap.put("0", new Integer(1)).

Unless you don't need, than use the unsynchronezed version of hashMap, searc it with google!

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