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I have a base class that I need to call functions on a class that is referenced in the child class.

Easy enough,

class base_class {

    public function doSomethingWithReference(){
        $this->reference->doSomething();
    }
}

class extended_class extends base_class{

    protected $reference;

    public function __construct($ref){
        $this->reference = $ref;
    }
}

Now this works fine obviously,

But, when I am debugging I don't care about the value of $this->reference

But, the object that $this->reference refers to is huge!

so, when I do print_r($instanceOfExtendedClass) I get the print out of that object.

Now the reference is different for each class that extends base_class.

What I wanted to do was just set reference as a static property on the extended_class class.

But, then changing doSomethingWithReference to be self::$reference throws an undefined variable error.

And conversely setting the static variable in base_class and modifying it from extended_class doesn't work as it changes the variable for all everything that extends from that class.

Is there any way to do this so I don't get the print out of $this->reference?

share|improve this question
2  
What PHP version are you working with? There were some big changes to static behavior in 5.3, and knowing if you're stuck on something older will give you a very different answer. –  Charles Dec 8 '12 at 5:09
1  
PHP version 5.3 –  Hailwood Dec 8 '12 at 8:23
    
This class structure violates something, I'm just not sure what it is :) –  Ja͢ck Dec 8 '12 at 8:37
    
@Jack Sanity perhaps? –  Hailwood Dec 8 '12 at 10:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you are using PHP 5.3, you can use late static binding to resolve the static call to the right class at runtime.

class base_class {

    public function doSomethingWithReference(){
        static::$reference->doSomething();
    }

}

class extended_class extends base_class{

    protected static $reference;

    public function __construct($ref){
        static::$reference = $ref;
    }

}

Big fat reminder: That one extended_class::$reference is going to be shared amongst all of the extended_class instances. If that is not what you intend, this is not going to work.

You seem to actually be worried about memory or resource use. In PHP, all objects are passed by reference. This means that passing an object as an argument, or creating a copy of it, etc, does not consume extra memory. If you need to reference an object in a number of other objects, doing so will not consume extra memory.


If I had extended_class and another identical class (say extended_class1) would they share the reference as well? or would all extended_class' instances share one reference, while all extended_class1' instances would share another (the ideal case)?

It looks like the sharing is based on where the static variable is defined. Two examples, both from the PHP interactive prompt:

php > class Shared { public $me; public function __construct($me) { $this->me = $me; } }
php > class Base { protected static $ref; public function foo() { echo static::$ref->me, "\n"; } }
php > class Inherit_1 extends Base { public function __construct($ref) { static::$ref = $ref; } }
php > class Inherit_2 extends Base { public function __construct($ref) { static::$ref = $ref; } }
php > class Inherit_3 extends Inherit_1 {}
php > $shared_1 = new Shared(1)
php > ;
php > $shared_2 = new Shared(2);
php > $shared_3 = new Shared(3);
php >
php > $in_1 = new Inherit_1($shared_1);
php > $in_2 = new Inherit_2($shared_2);
php > $in_3 = new Inherit_3($shared_3);
php >
php > $in_1->foo();
3
php > $in_2->foo();
3
php > $in_3->foo();
3

In this case, because the reference lives in the base class, everyone sees the same one. I suppose this makes some sort of sense.

What happens when we declare the reference with each child class.. most of the time?

php > class Shared { public $me; public function __construct($me) { $this->me = $me; } }
php > class Base { public function foo() { echo static::$ref->me, "\n"; } }
php > class Inherit_1 extends Base { protected static $ref; public function __construct($ref) { static::$ref = $ref; } }
php > class Inherit_2 extends Base { protected static $ref; public function __construct($ref) { static::$ref = $ref; } }
php > class Inherit_3 extends Inherit_1 {}
php > class Inherit_4 extends Inherit_1 { protected static $ref; }
php > $shared_1 = new Shared(1);
php > $shared_2 = new Shared(2);
php > $shared_3 = new Shared(3);
php > $shared_4 = new Shared(4);
php > $in_1 = new Inherit_1($shared_1);
php > $in_2 = new Inherit_2($shared_2);
php > $in_3 = new Inherit_3($shared_3);
php > $in_4 = new Inherit_4($shared_4);
php > $in_1->foo();
3
php > $in_2->foo();
2
php > $in_3->foo();
3
php > $in_4->foo();
4

Because 3 inherited from 1 without declaring it's own static property, it inherited 1's. When we set 3's to Shared(3), it overwrote 1's existing Shared(1).

Conclusion: For this to work, the property needs to be declared in every class that needs the single unique reference. Note that this code is valid as of 5.4.x.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not actually worried about memory, it is simply for debugging, I don't like having to scroll ~600 lines (Code Igniter objects!) to see what the objects properties are! your point about extended_class::$reference sharing the references, If I had extended_class and another identical class (say extended_class1) would they share the reference as well? or would all extended_class' instances share one reference, while all extended_class1' instances would share another (the ideal case)? –  Hailwood Dec 8 '12 at 8:40
    
@Hailwood, I have updated my answer with a test demonstrating where the static property is resolved. –  Charles Dec 8 '12 at 8:56

Provide a way for the parent to access the child's static member:

<?php

abstract class base_class {
    abstract protected function reference();
    // If you want to be able to instanciate base class directly, use the following 2 lines in place of the previous 2 lines:
//class base_class {
    //protected function reference() {}

    public function doSomethingWithReference(){
        $this->reference()->doSomething();
    }
}

class extended_class extends base_class{
    protected static $reference;

    public function __construct($ref){
        self::$reference = $ref;
    }

    protected function reference(){
        return self::$reference;
    }
}

class ref {
    public function doSomething(){
        echo __METHOD__;
    }
}

$ref = new ref();
$ec = new extended_class($ref);
$ec->doSomethingWithReference();

print_r($ec);
?>
share|improve this answer
2  
-1, this is just a code dump. You have not explained what this code is, why it works, how it works, and how it answers the question. –  Charles Dec 8 '12 at 8:25
2  
Thanks for the criticism, @Charles - no sarcasm intended. In fact, +1 to your comment. In the future, I'll be sure to be more verbose and not assume that the reader will understand what's happening just by reading the code. I don't have a box with PHP < 5.3 handy, but I believe this example will work for those that are stuck without late static bindings. Once I confirm it works in lesser versions, I will update my answer to explain the whys and hows, and state that this answer has value to users of PHP < 5.3. –  Starson Hochschild Dec 8 '12 at 16:36

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