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I have some C++ code that uses a very standard exception pattern:

try {
  // some code that throws a std::exception
}
catch (std::exception &e) {
  // handle the exception
}

The problem is that the exceptions are not being caught and I cannot figure out why.

The code compiles to a static library in OS X (via Xcode). The library is linked into a Cocoa application, with a call to the function in question happening via an Objective-C++ thunk. I suspect that the interplay between Objective-C and C++ is the culprit but all my attempts to pin this down have failed.

I have not been able to create a simple example that reproduces this behavior in a simple example. When I take the relevant code out of the context of my big program everything works.

Can anyone suggest why my exceptions are not being caught?

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1  
What evidence do you have to make you think an exception is being thrown? What evidence do you have that it derives from std::exception? (Not saying you're wrong, but there's a distinct lack of information here) –  Mooing Duck Aug 6 '13 at 21:27

8 Answers 8

Try a catch(...) {} block, see if an exception is really thrown.

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I don't understand this answer - The question already includes a catch() block. –  Michael Schneider May 9 '12 at 21:04
2  
The question includes a handler for exceptions of type std::exception. A catch block using an ellipsis (...) as the parameter of catch will catch any exception no matter what the type of the throw exception is. Much like a "default" handler. –  Michael Foukarakis May 10 '12 at 5:37

C++ allows you a variety of options for catching: value, reference or pointer. Note that this code only catches std::exceptions passed by reference or value:

try {
  // some code that throws a std::exception
}
catch (std::exception &e) {
  // handle the exception
}

It's likely that the exception is being passed by pointer:

catch (std::exception* e)

Check the code that is throwing the exception, and see how it's doing it.

As Mark points out, if you catch by value instead of by reference you risk slicing your object.

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Thank you - this just fixed my problem. –  Ben L Dec 10 '09 at 15:34
    
Glad to hear it, Ben L! –  Bill Dec 10 '09 at 21:18
    
This answer was a great find, coming from java/scripting languages background one naturally assumes that exceptions are always passed by value. Thx. –  Cray Oct 15 '12 at 22:35
2  
Sorry but this answer is wrong. You can catch an exception by value or reference, but it's always thrown by value - either catch will work correctly. Catching by reference is preferred to prevent exception object slicing. Throwing a pointer is a whole different thing, since std::exception* is a completely different type than std::exception. –  Mark Ransom Aug 1 '13 at 22:23
3  
@BenL: I highly recommend not throwing by pointer. Throw by value and catch by const reference. –  Mooing Duck Aug 6 '13 at 21:28

I suspect that the interplay between Objective-C and C++ is the culprit but all my attempts to pin this down have failed.

You're probably right, although it's hard to track down.

First, GCC explicitly does not allow you to throw exceptions in Objective C++ and catch them in C++ ("when used from Objective-C++, the Objective-C exception model does not interoperate with C++ exceptions at this time. This means you cannot @throw an exception from Objective-C and catch it in C++, or vice versa (i.e., throw ... @catch).")

However, I think you're describing a case where Objective C++ calls C++ code, the C++ code throws and you're hoping for C++ code to catch the exception. Unfortunately I'm having difficulty finding documentation for this specific case. There is some hope because, "It is believed to be safe to throw a C++ exception from one file through another file compiled for the Java exception model, or vice versa, but there may be bugs in this area." If they can do it for Java, there is a chance they can do it for Objective C++.

At the very least, you'll need to specify -fexceptions at compile time ("you may need to enable this option when compiling C code that needs to interoperate properly with exception handlers written in C++"). Again, that doesn't specifically mention Objective C++ but it may apply.

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One little known gotcha with exceptions relates to the access of the base class.

If you are actually throwing a class that derives privately from std::exception then the std::exception handler will not be chosen.

For example:

#include <iostream>

class A { };
class B : private A { } ;

int main ()
{
  try
  {
    throw B ();
  }
  catch (A & )
  {
    std::cout << "Caught an 'A'" << std::endl;
  }
  catch (B & )
  {
    std::cout << "Caught an 'B'" << std::endl;
  }
}

Usually, such an order of handlers would result in the 'B' handler never being selected, but in this case 'B' dervies from 'A' privately and so the catch handler for type 'A' is not considered.

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I can offer two theories:

  1. the exception gets caught before it comes your catch clause; any function on the stack might be the culprit. As Michael proposes, try catching everything.
  2. exception unwinding fails to locate your handler. To analyze this in more detail, you would have to step through the exception unwinding code, which is very hairy. See whether compiling the Objective-C code with -fobjc-exceptions helps.
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This might be a long shot, but in Visual Studio's compiler settings there is an option to switch off exceptions entirely. Perhaps there's something similar in GCC / XCode.

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C++ exceptions can be just about anything, quite frequently a char*. As suggested before add catch (...) to at least get it to break and see what's going on.

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1  
I have never seen a char* exception and would slap whoever used one –  Mooing Duck Aug 6 '13 at 21:30
up vote -1 down vote accepted

Thanks for the input from everyone. Those are good suggestions for anyone who runs into a similar problem. It's working now, but I'm not 100% sure which of various changes I made caused things to become sane again. Once again, the approach of simplifying down to something that works and building back up from there paid off.

One thing that wasn't mentioned in the responses, and which I think was part of my confusion, is to make sure that the handler makes it obvious that it actually caught the exception. I think that in some of my formulations of the handler it was masking that fact and passing the exception on to a higher level handler.

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