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I am writing a C program to find transitivity. In a 2D array, if adj[0][1] = 1 and adj[1][2] = 1, I want to mark adj[0][2] also as 1. This should hold for any transitive relation in the matrix.

Please help me with some code for this.

    adj_matrix[j1][j2]=1;

    for(i=0;i<26;i++)
    {
        if (adj_matrix[i][j1])
        adj_matrix[i][j2]=1;

    }
    for(i=0;i<26;i++)
    {
        if(adj_matrix[j2][i])
        {
        adj_matrix[j1][i]=1;
        }
    }   
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closed as too localized by Jonathan Leffler, berkes, Frank van Puffelen, user97693321, mah Dec 8 '12 at 14:40

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. In general, people will help you when you've shown some evidence of having tried to help yourself. A plain 'gimmedacodez' question is likely to be closed. What have you tried? Preferably, you should show us an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example) so we can help you with your problems. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 8 '12 at 6:12
    
HI as of now i have written the code like this. say j1 and j2 are the row n column i want to mark. –  Kiran Bangalore Dec 8 '12 at 6:16
    
It appears that you have a 26x26 array...it would be better to parameterize the size (maybe N). You need to test two conditions: adj[i][j] = 1 and adj[j][k] = 1 (i ≠ j and j ≠ k) and set adj[i][k] to 1. That smacks of three nested loops. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 8 '12 at 6:35
    
Thanks .. i am trying it .. hard coding 26 is intentional.. –  Kiran Bangalore Dec 8 '12 at 6:39
    
for(i=0;i<26;i++) for(j=0;j<26;j++) for(k=0;k<26;k++) if(adj_matrix[i][j] && adj_matrix[j][k]) adj_matrix[i][k]=1; –  Kiran Bangalore Dec 8 '12 at 6:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you want is a "transitive closure algorithm"

The Floyd-Warshall Algorithm is a good example of one of these, though there are many (many) others such as Johnson's Algorithm. A quick search on Google Scholar will point you towards some of the other sources and more technical descriptions.

The code for the Floyd-Warshall algorithm in its original form (which finds the shortest paths between every connected point) is:

int dist[N][N];  // For some N
int i, j, k;
// Input data into dist, where dist[i][j] is the distance from i to j.
// If the nodes are unconnected, dist[i][j] should be infinity

for ( k = 0; k < N; k++ )
for ( i = 0; i < N; i++ )
for ( j = 0; j < N; j++ )
   dist[i][j] = min( dist[i][j], dist[i][k] + dist[k][j] );

Modifying this code for your use scenario gives:

int dist[N][N];  // For some N
int i, j, k;
// Input data into dist, where dist[i][j] is the distance from i to j.
// If the nodes are unconnected, dist[i][j] should be infinity

for ( k = 0; k < N; k++ )
for ( i = 0; i < N; i++ )
for ( j = 0; j < N; j++ )
   if(dist[i][k] && dist[k][j])
      dist[i][j] = 1;

Notice that the order of the subscripts here. Having the subscripts in this order fulfills a criterion of dynamic programming which ensures that the path is improved incrementally and is at all times optimal.

The time complexity is O(N^3).

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I believe this will work:

reachable_matrix = adj_matrix
length_of_path = 1

while(length_of_path < (N - 1)) {
    for(i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
        for(j = 0; j < N; ++j) {
            tmp_matrix[i][j] = 0;
            for(k = 0; k < N; ++k) {
                tmp_matrix[i][j] ||= reachable_matrix[i][k] && reachable_matrix[k][j]; // Can I reach from i to j through k?
            }
        }
    }
    reachable_matrix = tmp_matrix;
    length_of_path *= 2;
}

As Richard commented, this is equivalent to calculating traversability of graph.

You can think of adj_matrix[i][j] as about a number saying how many paths of length 1 lead from from i to j. Then adj_matrix ** l (thats adjancency matrix to the power of l) tells you how many paths of length at least l there are between any two two nodes.

The inner loops in my code (looping with variables i, j and k) are basically multiplication of reachable_matrix by reachable_matrix and storing it in tmp_matrix, only instead of addition and multiplication I use logical or and and, because we're not interested in the exact number, only in its truth value.

Outer loop keeps squaring reachable_matrix while power to which it is raised (length of paths that we checked) is smaller than N - 1. Stopping at N - 1 is enough, because if you have a path of this length, it means that you are visiting all nodes in the graph. Paths with more steps necessarily must contain cycles. On the other hand I don't perform binary exponentiation exactly to keep things simple (I think it would be a little less efficient, but I'm not sure about that) and because trying longer paths doesn't do any harm.

Overall this algorithm has complexity O(log(N) * N**3).

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1  
I thought about my answer some more and traversability was probably the wrong word: "transitive closure" is more accurate and, as it happens, there are a number of algorithms to solve the problem. Floyd-Warshall is perhaps the best known. –  Richard Dec 8 '12 at 12:47
    
@cube . What modification should be done to the algorithm if "N" is varying? consider the biggest value of N? –  Kiran Bangalore May 18 at 21:50

Please let me know if this is correct.

for(i=0;i<26;i++) 
for(j=0;j<26;j++)
for(k=0;k<26;k++)
if(adj_matrix[i][j] && adj_matrix[j][k])
adj_matrix[i][k]=1;
share|improve this answer
    
The indentation is tatty, but the logic looks correct (except perhaps for the testing of i == j and j == k; I'm not sure whether those matter). Does it produce the answer you expected? Do you know what answer you expected? Wouldn't it be sensible to test the code on a 4x4 or 5x5 matrix before going for a 26x26 matrix? –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 8 '12 at 6:48
    
Hi, it was a very simple logic.. i just confused with from algorithms like BFS. any ways was very helpful. thanks –  Kiran Bangalore Dec 8 '12 at 7:19
1  
Not correct; you will have misses when you have longer chains (adj[3][2], adj[2][1], adj[1][0] --> should set adj[3][0] but doesn't) –  user1816548 Dec 8 '12 at 10:03
    
No, this is incorrect - but it is close! It does not fulfill the optimal substructure property of dynamic programming. My answer will point you to the Floyd-Warshall algorithm, which is subtly different from your answer, but produces the correct result. –  Richard Dec 8 '12 at 12:45

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