Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Getting Cross-thread operation not valid
Cross-thread operation not valid

I am trying to listen to COM port so that I create new handler for SerialPort.DataReceived event. The logic is simple - I write something to TextBox1, press Button1 and my text should show it self in Label1. But my application don't want to run, becouse it throws 'Cross thread operation not valid' error. I did some searching and found Invoke object - how can I use it in my example? Why do I need to include Invoke logic?

namespace WindowsApplication1
{
public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    SerialPort sp = new SerialPort();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        sp.DataReceived += MyDataReceivedHandler;
    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }

    private void MyDataReceivedHandler(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            //sp.PortName = "COM3";
            //sp.Open();
            Label1.Text = sp.ReadLine();
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            RichTextBox1.Text = exception.Message + "\n\n" + exception.Data;
        }
        finally
        {
            sp.Close();
        }
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            sp.PortName = "COM3";
            sp.Open();
            sp.WriteLine(TextBox1.Text);
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            RichTextBox1.Text = exception.Message + "\n\n" + exception.Data;
        }
        finally
        {
            sp.Close();
        }
    }
}

}

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by abatishchev, Greg Bacon, Isaac, Ram kiran, Alastair Pitts Dec 10 '12 at 3:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@ Peter: COM port here is the RS232 serial interface. Despite USB and all there are still a number of devices (e.g. GPS, Medical) that use the serial port for PC communication. –  Sesh Sep 4 '09 at 6:55
    
@_simon_: Just curious: what is the COM port used for in this particular application? –  Peter Mortensen Sep 4 '09 at 7:31
    
@_simon_: I updated my answer –  Fredrik Mörk Sep 4 '09 at 9:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

My guess is that MyDataReceivedHandler is running on a different thread than the GUI. In order to fix that, you need to invoke the Text setters on the correct thread. This is a sample of doing so:

public void SetControlText(Control control, string text)
{
    if (this.InvokeRequired)
    {
        this.Invoke(new Action<Control,string>(SetControlText), new object[] { control, text });
    }
    else
    {
        control.Text = text;
    }
}

private void MyDataReceivedHandler(object sender, SerialDataReceivedEventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        //sp.PortName = "COM3";
        //sp.Open();
        SetControlText(Label1, sp.ReadLine());
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        SetControlText(RichTextBox1, exception.Message + "\n\n" + exception.Data);
    }
    finally
    {
        sp.Close();
    }
}

If you are using .NET Framework 2.0, the above Action<T1, T2> delegate is not available, so you will have to define your own one:

private delegate void SetControlTextHandler(Control control, string text);

public void SetControlText(Control control, string text)
{
    if (this.InvokeRequired)
    {
        this.Invoke(new SetControlTextHandler(SetControlText), new object[] { control, text });
    }
    else
    {
        control.Text = text;
    }
}

The SetControlText method can be made shorter (and even static) like this (this works in both 2.0 and 3.5):

public static void SetControlText(Control control, string text)
{
    ´control.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate { control.Text = text; });
}

Then you don't need to do the check of InvokeRequired each time, but you will on the other hand wrap the call in a delegate even if it is not needed. I think that in a GUI method like this any performance difference between those two is neglectible so I tend to use the shorter form, simply because it is less code to write.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems, that this works only in 3.5. I use Visual studio 2005, now I installed 3.5 SP1. Where in Visual studio 2005 can I set which .NET framework I am using? –  sventevit Sep 4 '09 at 8:07
    
@_simon_: I have updated the answer with 2.0 compatible versions –  Fredrik Mörk Sep 4 '09 at 9:07
    
Note: If the operation performed in the delegate is long running, it can still block the UI as the invoke will just cause the UI thread to process the operation. Using BeginInvoke on all controls that implement it will perform the operation asynchronously, without blocking. –  SnOrfus Sep 4 '09 at 20:38
    
+1 and should you not call the invoke/begininvoke on the control, and not on 'this' (the form)? –  SnOrfus Sep 4 '09 at 20:40

You can also do the following whenever accessing a UI control from a different thread than the one it was created on:

(.NET 3.5)

myControl.BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker( () => myControl.whatever = whatever; ));

or (.NET 2.0)

myControl.BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker( delegate { myControl.whatever = whatever; ));

edit> Sometimes using Invoke for a long running operation can/will still hang the ui, using BeginInvoke obviously performs that operation asynchronously, and the ui will not hang.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.