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(defun prefix (a y) (cond ((null y) nil)
    (t (cons (cons a (car y)) (prefix a (cdr y))))))
(setq result prefix(a (cons 1 2)))
(print result)

This function cdr's through the list y, printing (a (car y)) recursively. If P is the first parameter, and y is the list (1 2 3), it should return ((P1) (P2) (P3)). However, I can't get the function to work when I try to give it parameters and execute it. What is incorrect here?

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3 Answers 3

Please take a look at the introductory lisp texts available before you do anything else.

[dons code-review hat]

(defun prefix (a y) (cond ((null y) nil)
    (t (cons (cons a (car y)) (prefix a (cdr y))))))

(setq result prefix(a (cons 1 2)))

(print result)

Firstly, these definitions don't do what your prose description says they should; you don't have any printing in as part of your recursive function. You print result, but that's after the prefixed list has been put together in its entirety. Your prefix function also doesn't return new symbols, but rather pairs.


There's no need to set intermediate values in order to print them; Lisp functions return implicitly and can be composed without setq

(defun prefix (a y) 
  (cond ((null y) nil)
         (t (cons (cons a (car y)) 
              (prefix a (cdr y))))))

(print prefix(a (cons 1 2)))

Lisp is entirely prefix notated, and function names appear inside of the calling parentheses.

...

(print (prefix a (cons 1 2)))

a in your prefix call is an unbound variable. I think you either meant to use "the symbol a", which is 'a, or "the keyword a", which is :a. If you merely pass a, Lisp will try to evaluate that name as a variable, and fail if you don't have a value assigned to it.

...

(print (prefix 'a (cons 1 2)))

Your second argument to prefix isn't a proper list; it's a pair. In order to see the difference, you need to take a look at the underlying pointer structure of both constructs.

(cons 1 2) => [ 1 | 2 ]
(list 1 2) => [ 1 |   ]
                    \
                  [ 2 |  ]
                        \
                        NIL

If you try to use a pair where a function is expecting a proper list, you'll get the error #<TYPE-ERROR expected-type: LIST datum: 2> because the tail of a pair is not a list, whereas the tail of a list is.


(defun prefix (a y) 
  (cond ((null y) nil)
         (t (cons (cons a (car y)) 
              (prefix a (cdr y))))))

(print (prefix 'a (list 1 2)))

At this point, you've got a runnable program. Evaluating (print (prefix 'a (list 1 2))) at the REPL after defining that function should give you

CL-USER> (print (prefix 'a (list 1 2)))

((A . 1) (A . 2)) 
((A . 1) (A . 2))

Note that we've got duplicate output; this is because the Lisp REPL automatically prints the return value of any form you evaluate, which means that you can actually drop print entirely.

CL-USER> (prefix 'a (list 1 2))
((A . 1) (A . 2))

In order to do what you said you wanted (create a new list of symbols with the first argument as the prefix), you'll actually need to use some string operations and intern to create symbols.

(defun prefix (a y) 
  (cond ((null y) nil)
         (t (cons (intern (format nil "~a~a" a (car y)))
              (prefix a (cdr y))))))

(prefix 'a (list 1 2)) should now return (A1 A2). Note that Common Lisp is case-insensitive, automatically converting lower-case symbols to upper-case.


Recursion is a good learning tool, and tail recursion is the principal iteration construct in Scheme, but it's usually a good idea to do things iteratively if you can. Note that CL doesn't guarantee tail-call optimizations, so this typically means using loop or mapcar (or dolist in some situations).

(defun iterative-prefix (a a-list)
  (loop for elem in a-list
        collect (intern (format nil "~a~a" a elem))))

(defun map-prefix (a a-list)
  (mapcar 
   (lambda (elem) (intern (format nil "~a~a" a elem)))
   a-list))

These will both give you the same output as the recursive version, but don't have the same risk of running out of stack space if you give them a sufficiently long list.

CL-USER> (prefix 'a (make-list 100000 :initial-element 1))
Control stack guard page temporarily disabled: proceed with caution
Control stack guard page temporarily disabled: proceed with caution
; Evaluation aborted on #<SB-KERNEL::CONTROL-STACK-EXHAUSTED {1004D674F3}>.

CL-USER> (iterative-prefix 'a (make-list 100000 :initial-element 1))
(A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 A1 ...)

CL-USER>
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Two comments:

First, cons returns a new cons cell with the first argument in the cons and the second in the cdr of the cell. So (cons 1 2) creates a new cons cell (1 . 2) which is what you are seeing.

If you want the result to be the list (1 2) the second argument needs to be a list: (cons 1 '(2))

Second, you've written some rather ugly C-style Lisp code. Consider:

(defun prefix (a y)
  (if ((null y) nil)
    (cons (cons a (car y)) (prefix a (cdr y)))))
(print (prefix a '( 1 2))))

Notes: Don't create variables that are only used in the following line. Layout your code properly (people don't parse the parentheses when reading Lisp, they rely on conventional layout). Use if instead of cond if there is only one test plus a default (i.e. if/then/else).

Your code still has errors (I haven't fixed those). It doesn't look like you've actually written this code inside a REPL- you'll find it much easier to write Lisp code if you do. It's one of the big advantages of Lisp over the Algol languages.

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This function cdr's through the list y, printing (a (car y)) recursively.

How can it print anything? There is not a single print statement in the function.

If P is the first parameter, and y is the list (1 2 3), it should return ((P1) (P2) (P3)).

From looking at your code, it would return ((P . 1) (P . 2) (P . 3)) and not ((P1) (P2) (P3)).

However, I can't get the function to work when I try to give it parameters and execute it. What is incorrect here?

Your call looks wrong. prefix( ... ) something does not look like Lisp. In Lisp the syntax for calling functions is (prefix ... ). The function name goes after the opening parentheses.

(defun prefix (a y)
  (cond ((null y) nil)
        (t (cons (cons a (car y))
                 (prefix a (cdr y))))))

(setq result prefix(a (cons 1 2)))  ; this line has problems

(print result)
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Ah, okay. I fixed it. ideone.com/FyeJVR Though, I would like to figure out how to change ((P . 1)) to ((P1)). –  user748176 Dec 8 '12 at 9:51

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