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double n = 1.3243;
for (int i = 0; long(n*10) % 10 != 0; i++, n *= 10) {

}

I've written this code in order to understand whether a number has a decimal part or not.

At the end of the loop 'i' should be 4 but for some reason the counter doesn't increment.

Except for the fact that you may not like my solution, do you have any suggestions?

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5  
Since floating-point numbers aren't exact, you'd be better off checking if ((int)n - n) < epsilon)... –  user529758 Dec 8 '12 at 9:04
3  
In the code you pasted, there's no possible way to know what i is at the end of the loop. Please post your real code. –  David Schwartz Dec 8 '12 at 9:04
1  
@H2CO3 He's casting to long before doing modular arithmatic, which works fine. No floating-point comparison going on here. –  Joost Dec 8 '12 at 9:09
1  
@Joost I know that, I'm saying that 1.3243 may not be exactly representable, so the loop may not end where OP thinks it should... –  user529758 Dec 8 '12 at 9:13
1  
@Joost Of course, and you are right too in either case :) No worries. –  user529758 Dec 8 '12 at 9:19
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

At the end of your loop, the i-variable does no longer exist. You're declaring it inside the function scope. This results in not being able to access it outside the loop. If you do something like:

double n = 1.3243;
for (int i = 0; long(n*10) % 10 != 0; i++, n *= 10) {   
}
printf("%d\n", i);

GGC gives me a loop.cpp:10: error: name lookup of ‘i’ changed for new ISO ‘for’ scoping error.

The following would fix that (notice how the for-loop does not need curly brackets if it's empty):

double n = 1.3243;
int i;
for (i = 0; long(n*10) % 10 != 0; i++, n *= 10);
printf("%d\n", i);

Using GCC 4.2.1, this gives me the output of 4

But the loop you presented has an inconvenient bug, when testing for decimal numbers. As src remarked in his comment, a zero in the decimals cancels any decimals behind it. The loop simply breaks off as soon as it finds a zero value, but there could be more decimals following. Depending on the type of floats you're dealing with, this could be quite a problem.

Do note: The most common solution is the following comparison:

double n = 1.3243;
if (n == (int)n) {
    // do stuff
}

This fixes the error presented by src: 1.01 is said to have decimals, like it should. The loop solution (wrongly) returns i=0 for this float.

The comparison n == (int)n returns true when your float does not have any decimal parts.

As H2CO3 mentioned, testing the decimals of a float-point number is not 100% definite, as floating point rounding might give you a slightly different answer than you're expecting. It works in the general case, though, so you'll have to see for yourself if it fits the problem you're solving.

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And +1, of course. Well spotted. –  user529758 Dec 8 '12 at 9:20
    
Thank you very much, Joost, you solved my problem brilliantly. –  fpiro07 Dec 9 '12 at 0:04
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your code is working fine. i =0 , n = 1.3243 .. i =1 , n = 13.243 .. i =2 , n = 123.43 .. i =3 , n = 1234.3 and then terminate if you declare "i" outside the for loop you will get it.

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