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I have this code: The program got stuck when the first child sending to the second child the data, the second child do fscanf and then stuck because he cant read i cant find the reason for it. please help me to find out how can i make sure that the fflush will transfer the data.

int main()
{
    pid_t childPid ; //Child's and father process id.
    int i ; //An index to create children in loop.
    unsigned int st_search_prime = 0 ;

    if((mkfifo(FIRST_FIFO, S_IFIFO | 0644) == FAIL && errno != EEXIST) ||
       (mkfifo(SECOND_FIFO, S_IFIFO | 0644) == FAIL && errno != EEXIST))
    {
        perror("Cannot create fifo file") ;
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE) ;
    }
    //create the children
    for(i = 0 ; i < NUM_OF_CHILDS  ; i++)
    {
        childPid = fork() ;
        if(childPid < 0)    //Fork failed.
        {
            perror("Cannot fork()") ;
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE) ;
        }
        else if(childPid == CHILD)  //child process
        {
            if(i == FIRST_SON)  //the 1st child process
                doChild1(st_search_prime) ;
            else        //the 2nd child process.
                doChild2(st_search_prime) ;
        }
    }
    //wait for the children to exit.
    for(i = 0 ; i < NUM_OF_CHILDS ; i++)
        wait(&childPid) ;

    return(EXIT_SUCCESS) ;
}

void doChild1(unsigned int st_search_prime)
{
    int counter = 0 ; //Counter for N successfully raffle .
    FILE* fdw1 ;
    FILE* fdr2 ;

    if((!(fdw1 = fopen(FIRST_FIFO, "w"))))
    {
        perror("Cannot open fifo file for w/r") ;
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE) ;
    }

    if((!(fdr2 = fopen(SECOND_FIFO, "r"))))
    {
        perror("Cannot open fifo file for w/r") ;
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE) ;
    }

    for(; counter < N ; counter++)
    {
        st_search_prime = raffle_prime(st_search_prime) ;
        **fprintf(fdw1, "%u\n", st_search_prime) ;
        fflush(fdw1) ;**
        printf("%u\n", st_search_prime) ;
        fscanf(fdr2, "%u\n", &st_search_prime) ;
    }
    fclose(fdw1) ;
    fclose(fdr2) ;

    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS) ;
}

void doChild2(unsigned int st_search_prime)
{
    int counter = 0 ; //Counter for N successfully raffle .
    FILE* fdw2 ;
    FILE* fdr1 ;

    if((!(fdr1 = fopen(FIRST_FIFO, "r"))))
    {
        perror("Cannot open fifo file for w/r") ;
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE) ;
    }
    if(!(fdw2 = fopen(SECOND_FIFO, "w")))
    {
        perror("Cannot open fifo file for w/r") ;
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE) ;
    }

    for(; counter < N ; counter++)
    {
        **fscanf(fdr1, "%u\n", &st_search_prime);**
        st_search_prime = raffle_prime(st_search_prime) ;
        fprintf(fdw2, "%u\n", st_search_prime) ;
        fflush(fdw2) ;
        printf("%u\n", st_search_prime) ;
    }
    fclose(fdr1) ;
    fclose(fdw2) ;

    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS) ;
}
share|improve this question
    
Consider calling read() for a fixed number of bytes, then call sscanf on the string returned by read. read on a pipe will also return fewer bytes - fscanf is blocking because the file pointer is not where you assume it to be. read() doesn't "care" and will just return what is there. – jim mcnamara Dec 8 '12 at 12:54
    
As it is, your issue may be related to pieces of your code that are missing. Please provide an MCVE. – Seb Jul 22 '15 at 12:35

Try adding call setlinebuf(fdw1) - this should help.

This call forces flushing buffer after newline. Also you can use setvbuf() with parameter _IOLBF to get the same effect or with _IONBF to disable buffering completely.

share|improve this answer
    
tnx, but still the program stuck. – shlomi Dec 8 '12 at 10:10

The problem I believe is the use of \n in your fscanf pattern. The manual page for fscanf says:

The format string consists of a sequence of directives which describe how to process the sequence of input characters. If processing of a directive fails, no further input is read, and scanf() returns. A "failure" can be either of the following: input failure, meaning that input characters were unavailable, or matching failure, meaning that the input was inappropriate ...

Also, under directives we have:

A sequence of white-space characters (space, tab, newline, etc.; see isspace(3)). This directive matches any amount of white space, including none, in the input.

So, when in doChild2 you use the fscanf pattern "%u\n" the pattern is made of two input directives, the %u which matches the incoming number, then \n which matches the incoming newline (white space). At this point the fscanf will continue looking for more input, which as no more input is sent results in your program blocking.

And why does fscanf go back to look for more input? The first quote above tells us the two conditions for termination, either no more input; well the fifo is still open, so we don't know that more input is not on the way, so that condition is not met, alternatively, fscanf will return if a directive fails to match; but that has not happened yet.

As far as a fix goes then removing the \n from the fscanf pattern should be enough. The manual page tells us that:

Most conversions discard initial white space characters...

and this is the case for %u, so if you send using a pattern of %u\n but fscanf with a pattern of %u then the \n will serve to cause a match failure on the %u directive, causing fscanf to return. This will leave the \n in the input buffer, however, the next call to fscanf will discard the initial white space (newline) and all should be well.

share|improve this answer

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