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I'm using jQuery.data() to store jQuery DOM object references:

myObj.data('key', $('#element_id'));

I'll be using this a lot (for often the same DOM objects), so I wouldn't like to take up too much memory. Does jQuery store a reference, or does it store a deep copy of the DOM object? In that case I suppose it's better to store the element id instead of the element reference.

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You can utilize the jQuery source viewer to investigate: james.padolsey.com/jquery/#v=git&fn=jQuery.data –  Dan Lee Dec 8 '12 at 10:37
    
Why would there be a deep copy of the DOM object ? That would be totally useless. –  Denys Séguret Dec 8 '12 at 10:38
    
I would be most surprised if it stores anything other than a reference. Deep copy would not be right. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Dec 8 '12 at 10:45
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myObj.data('key', $('#element_id').clone()); would store a deep copy (detached from the DOM), if you ever need that. –  Frédéric Hamidi Dec 8 '12 at 11:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The jQuery object you build with $('#element_id') contains

  • a reference to the context (the document here)
  • the selector
  • cached : the length (0 or 1 in your case) and the references of the found dom node
  • the pointer to the prototype (so that you can call methods)

What you store in data (in the node) is the jQuery object. This object doesn't contain any deep copy of the referenced DOM node, so you're not storing a deep copy but just a small object mainly containing a string and a few pointers.

And as the DOM node reference is cached, it's more efficient than just having the id (marginally, as finding a node by id is always fast, but if you had a more complex selector this would make a difference).

So what you do is fine and efficient in my opinion.

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Very interesting but does this answer the question posed, which is about .data() not jQuery objects per se. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Dec 8 '12 at 11:03
    
What you store in data (in the node) is the jQuery object. This object doesn't contain any deep copy of the referenced DOM node, so you're not storing a deep copy but just a small object mainly containing a string and a few pointers. –  Denys Séguret Dec 8 '12 at 11:05
    
Agreed. I think that text belongs in the answer. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Dec 8 '12 at 11:10
    
@Beetroot-Beetroot OK. Edited to include it. –  Denys Séguret Dec 8 '12 at 11:14

You can always look at the source directly, yay for open source : )

Lines 51 & 52 of data.js have the helpful comment:

// An object can be passed to jQuery.data instead of a key/value pair; this gets

// shallow copied over onto the existing cache

So I guess it's a shallow copy!

update 07/14 -- that link was to head:master so now is completely out of date, here's a canonical link to what i was talking about: as at 16ba6ff

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