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I have these two tables

  • personal_details (id, name, surname, date_of_birth)
  • employee (id, hire_date)

I need to set the hire_date on the employee table to the date_of_birth + 10 years.

UPDATE employee E
SET E.date_hire = add_months(D.date_of_birth, 120);
FROM employee E, personal_details D
WHERE E.ID = D.ID

It's so odd that it is not working, anyone can see something there ?

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closed as not a real question by GolezTrol, Mr. Alien, Moritz Bunkus, chill, Eric Dec 9 '12 at 0:48

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Any error you got? –  GolezTrol Dec 8 '12 at 10:43
    
yeah its not working for somereason –  Anysiya Dec 8 '12 at 10:45
6  
That's not an error. I mean concrete error messages. –  GolezTrol Dec 8 '12 at 10:46
    
Did you check the manual for the correct syntax? –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 8 '12 at 11:25

4 Answers 4

I wonder what company starts hiring people of 10 years old, but ok.

UPDATE employee E
SET E.date_hire = 
    (SELECT
      add_months(D.date_birth, 120)
    FROM
      personal_details D
    WHERE
      D.ID = E.ID)
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I would write it like this:

UPDATE employee E
SET E.date_hire = COALESCE(
    ( SELECT add_months(D.date_of_birth, 120)
      FROM personal_details D
      WHERE E.ID = D.ID
    ), E.date_hire) ;

or this - which I find more intuitive:

UPDATE 
  ( SELECT E.date_hire, add_months(D.date_of_birth, 120) AS new_date_hire
    FROM employee E
      JOIN personal_details D
        ON E.ID = D.ID
  )
SET E.date_hire = new_date_hire ;
share|improve this answer
    
Introducing the coalesce for what reason? –  GolezTrol Dec 8 '12 at 10:50
    
@GolezTrol: The COALESCE() is to to ensure that the E.date_hire will not be updated (with NULL) when there is no matching row in the personal_details table. –  ypercube Dec 8 '12 at 10:51
    
I understand that, but it's not in the specs and it could hide the fact that personal details are missing. –  GolezTrol Dec 8 '12 at 10:52
    
@GolezTrol: I think it is as the OP is tryng to do an (implicit) join that would not change any non-matching rows. –  ypercube Dec 8 '12 at 10:53
    
Ok, you could be right about that. –  GolezTrol Dec 8 '12 at 10:54

employee (id,hire_date,salary,bonus)

SET E.date_hire

The column names don't match.

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You say the column name is hire_date and then set a column called date_hire

UPDATE employee E 
SET E.date_hire = add_months(D.date_birth, 120); 

You have a semi colon at the end of that statement which means the rest of the sql is treated as separate

You need to include a SELECT to actually retrieve the data

You'll be a lot closer when you've got that lot sorted :-)

(I chose not to just give the sql)

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