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I have a problem with the following method:

public IQueryable<Customer> ListCustomers(int? parentId)
{
    Debug.Assert(parentId == null);
    //var list = _customerRepository.List().Where(c => c.ParentId == null);
    var list = _customerRepository.List().Where(c => c.ParentId == parentId);
    return list;
}

I have one Customer in my DB with a ParentId of null. When I call the method with ListCustomers(null), list is empty for the return statement. If I swap the commented out line in and query with a hard-coded null, then list contains my one customer.

What could cause this difference between these two queries? Why is the one with c.ParentId == parentId not returning anything?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

with nullable types you have to use it like this:

 .Where(c=> object.Equals(c.ParentId, parentId))
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When parentId has a value, I get an EF NotSupportedException with this solution. Can anyone else confirm this? –  Nicholas Butler Dec 8 '12 at 12:50

Becouse the Nullable type the linq provider will not generate the proper IS NULL check. See this answer for further information: http://stackoverflow.com/a/785501/1195510

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EF translates your query with int? to something like this:

DECLARE @parentId Int = null
SELECT ... WHERE ParentId = @parentId

When this is executed on the database, it doesn't do what you expect because in SQL [column] = NULL is always false.

I agree EF could handle this better, but as a workaround, you can write something like this:

.Where( c => !parentId.HasValue
  ? !c.ParentId.HasValue 
  : c.ParentId.Value == parentId.Value
)

EF will then generate a ( somewhat verbose ) SQL statement with the correct IS NULL predicates.

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