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I have this code:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics.Contracts;

namespace TestCodeContracts
{
    class Program
    {
        public static int Divide(int numerator, int denominator, out int remainder)
        {
            Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>(denominator != 0);
            Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>(numerator != int.MinValue || denominator != -1, "Overflow");
            Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<int>() == numerator / denominator);
            Contract.Ensures(Contract.ValueAtReturn<int>(out remainder) == numerator % denominator);

            remainder = numerator % denominator;
            return numerator / denominator;
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int remainder;
            Console.WriteLine(Divide(10, 6, out remainder));
            Console.WriteLine(Divide(5, remainder, out remainder));

            Console.WriteLine(Divide(3, 0, out remainder));

            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}

On the first Divide call, if I replace 6 by 0, then the static analysis correctly warns against it.

If I replace 6 by 5, then I (correctly) get a warning on the second Divide call.

However, no matter what, I never get any warnings on the third Divide call. Instead, I just get a runtime error.

Why is the static analyzer unable to detect that the third line is a contract violation?

I am using Visual Studio 2012, on Windows 8 64-bit. The code contracts is Microsoft Code Contracts (devlabs_TS) 1.4.51019.0 for .NET (which seems to be the latest version as of December 2012).

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Did you check this very thoroughly? With rebuilds in between? It migt be better to setup more test-calls (instead of the 'changing 6 to 0 approach). –  Henk Holterman Dec 8 '12 at 13:37
    
@HenkHolterman Rebuilding doesn't change my results. Additionally, if I isolate my three cases(6, 5 and 0 for the first Divide call) in three test functions (Test1, Test2 and Test3), and then call the three test functions, I get warnings in only two of those test functions - the third divide call of each test function never gets a warning, even though it is obviously a contract violation. –  luiscubal Dec 8 '12 at 13:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I posted this in the code contracts forum. It is confirmed that this is indeed a bug and that it will be fixed.

The bug is that the static verifier thinks that the Divide(3, 0... ) is unreachable

(...)

We will fix the bug.

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This is an interesting problem.

I finally simplified Divide down to this:

public static int Divide(int numerator, int denominator)
{
    Contract.Requires<ArgumentException>(denominator != 0);
    return numerator / denominator;
}

This throws the correct warning:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine(Divide(10, 10));
    Console.WriteLine(Divide(10, 0));
}

Note that I found you have to generally rebuild rather than build, even with only one project. There must be code contract artefacts that get cleaned up on the rebuild.

This doesn't throw the warning:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine(Divide(10, 9));
    Console.WriteLine(Divide(10, 0));
}

The only way I could trigger the warning was if the denominator for the first divide was 10 (and it obviously also worked when it was 0).

It does seem like a bug - I'd send an email to the code contracts team and see what they say.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean with "you have to rebuild rather than build". Do you mean "you have to in order to have it work correctly" or "you have to in order to reproduce this behavior"? I am unable to reproduce this for Divide(10, 9) - I still get the warning in that case. Either way, I haven't sent an email but I posted it on their forums - social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/codecontracts/thread/… –  luiscubal Dec 10 '12 at 18:06
    
I had to rebuild in order for the code contracts to work correctly. –  Mightymuke Dec 10 '12 at 19:19

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