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I want to use Repository Pattern (I know that I can use Unit of Work Pattern but I would like to use Repository Pattern here). So in each repository class I have queries for a specific table, for example:

public class NotesRepository : INotesRepository, IDisposable
{
    private DatabaseContext context;

    public NotesRepository(DatabaseContext context)
    {
        this.context = context;
    }

    public IQueryable<Notes> GetAllNotes()
    {
        return (from x in context.Notes
                select x);
    }
}

And another repository example:

public class CommentsRepository : ICommentsRepository, IDisposable
{
    private DatabaseContext context;

    public CommentsRepository(DatabaseContext context)
    {
        this.context = context;
    }

    public IQueryable<Comments> GetAllComments()
    {
        return (from x in context.Comments
                select x);
    }
}

Now I would like to use these two repositories in one controller. So with the Repository Pattern I initialize the database connection in the controller constructor and pass it to each repository, am I right? For example:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private INotesRepository NotesRepository;
    private ICommentsRepository CommentsRepository;

    public HomeController()
    {
        DatabaseContext db = new DatabaseContext();

        this.NotesRepository = new NotesRepository(db);
        this.CommentsRepository = new CommentsRepository(db);
    }

    // ........
}
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3 Answers 3

I think you should take this at least one step further, by having the Controller take the repositories as dependency in the constructor. This means you would be creating the Controller and Repository instances in a custom ControllerFactory (used in ASP.NET MVC and MVC2) or a DependencyResolver (introduced in ASP.NET MVC3 IIRC; which is a good fit if moving to a IoC Container). The DatabaseContext is normally created per HttpRequest in a web application, in order to maintain the same UnitOfWork during the request. If you're using a IoC container, this is easily done, since support for this is built into all major containers. If you're doing it manually, you have to wire up some mechanisms for creating and disposing the DatabaseContext in the Application.BeginRequest and EndRequest events.

For simplicity I'll give you a ASP.NET MVC example without the use of a container and having one DatabaseContext instance per Controller. Also the DatabaseContext is not disposed when the Controller is "released".

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private INotesRepository notesRepository;
    private ICommentsRepository commentsRepository;

    public HomeController(INotesRepository notesRepostory, 
        ICommentsRepository commentsRepository)
    {
        this.notesRepository = notesRepository;
        this.commentsRepository = commentsRepository;
    }
}

public class MyControllerFactory : DefaultControllerFactory
{
    protected override IController GetControllerInstance(
        RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType)
    {
        if (controllerType == null)
            return base.GetControllerInstance(requestContext, controllerType);

        DatabaseContext db = new DatabaseContext();
        //Here you should have logic to determine which 
        //type of controller to create
        return new HomeController(new NotesRepository(db), 
            new CommentsRepository(db));
    }
}

In the Global.asax Application.Start event handler:

ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(new MyControllerFactory());

There are lots of examples of IoC with MVC and your favorite brand of Container if you go on the container route.

The advantage of using Inversion of Control is that the application becomes loosely coupled and easier to change and maintain.

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Could you give me example for asp.net mvc 3? –  michael Dec 8 '12 at 16:58
1  
Here is a full blown example using Unity as a IoC container, but it's easy to find similar examples for the other containers. Also, don't forget to check out the dependency-injection tag for further discussions of IoC and Dependency Injection. –  PHeiberg Dec 8 '12 at 17:29

when you use a repository you want to abstract your data access code away from your business logic, so taking care of the connection inside your controller is not very clean. maybe a repository is not what you need here...

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The case here is quite suitable for using Dependency Injection (DatabaseContext is a dependency for both NotesRepository and CommentsRepository).

That is easily solved by Dependency Injection Containers like Ninject.

share|improve this answer
    
that is not what he is asking... DI is great but irrelevant here... –  Zdravko Danev Dec 8 '12 at 14:10
2  
Hmm, I think this suggestion could certainly help (though a bit more body to this answer would be needed before it's useful to the OP). With a DI approach you could express that the HomeController depends on the two repositories (in a better way than the current tight coupling), and have the repositories depend on a DatabaseContext. –  Jeroen Dec 8 '12 at 14:29
    
@Jeroen That's what I'm looking for. I can use ninject to bind my IRepository to my concrete repo to inject it into my controller. But how to I go about and inject MyDbContext into my repos? Or is this not an issue? I just assumed MyDbContext should only have a single instance. –  Jesse Seger Jul 10 '13 at 20:01

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