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I've been doing some work with C# Networking using UDP. I'm getting on fine but need the answer to a couple of fundamental questions I'm having problems testing:

  • Currently I'm sending data in a ~16000 byte datagrams, which according to wireshark is getting split into several 1500 byte packets (because of max packet size limits) and then reassembled at the other end.

Am I right in understanding the datagram will be received complete at the other end OR not at all. IE it's an all or nothing thing. There is no chance of ending up with a fragmented datagram due to packet loss?

Therefore, I only need to ACK per datagram, rather than ensuring my datagrams are < 1500 bytes and ACK each one?

I've looked in a lot of places but there seems to be a lot of confusion between the differences between datagrams and the underlying packets...

Thanks for you help!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no chance of ending up with a fragmented datagram due to packet loss?

I believe that's true: that fragmentation and fragment reassembly is handled by the protocol layer below UDP, i.e. that it's handled by the "IP" layer, which will error if it fails to reassemble the packet-fragments into a datagram (for example, search for "fragment" in RFC 792).

http://www.pcvr.nl/tcpip/udp_user.htm#11_5 says,

"The IP layer at the destination performs the reassembly. The goal is to make fragmentation and reassembly transparent to the transport layer (TCP and UDP), which it is, except for possible performance degradation."

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As you may now 16 bit UDP length field indicates that you can send a total of 65535 bytes. However, the data can be theoretically (sizeof(IP Header) + sizeof(UDP Header)) = 65535-(20+8) = 65507 bytes.

But this does not mean that all applications that are using UDP will send this amount of data as an example DNS packets limits to 512 bytes. This is because you don't get any ACK packets from server. This is one reason that packets may get lost in the network (packet transmission problems and loss). Secondly intermediate nodes may encapsulate datagrams inside of another protocol, as an example IPSEC or other protocols do that.

For UDP there is no ACK packets, so in your case if underlying application uses UDP you should not see any ACK packets. Secondly, some of the server limit their sizes to the max UDP packets depending on the application, so if you have data transfer from client to server you should see same bytes e.g 512 bytes. going and coming back in wireshark. Mostly, source makes the request and destination sends X bytes UDP datagrams back.

These links may be good for your questions:

  1. Wireshark UDP analysis
  2. RFC 1122 (states that 576 is the minimum maximum reassembly buffer size)
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1  
I think the OP is talking about sending an application-level ACK via UDP. –  ChrisW Dec 8 '12 at 14:29
    
Yeah I'm sending ACKs myself as a packet number (uint 16) and a set of ack flags (the previous 32 acks in a int32 bitmask) –  Chris Bampton Dec 8 '12 at 15:37

Am I right in understanding the datagram will be received complete at the other end OR not at all. IE it's an all or nothing thing. There is no chance of ending up with a fragmented datagram due to packet loss?

That is correct.

Therefore, I only need to ACK per datagram, rather than ensuring my datagrams are < 1500 bytes and ACK each one?

I don't understand this question. You need to ACK each datagram regardless of its size, and you should make them < 1500 bytes so they won't get fragmented. Otherwise you may never be able to transmit any specific datagrams at all, if it repeatedly gets fragmented and a fragment repeatedly gets lost.

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