Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wonder how could i print a row number for sql statement where is using order. Currently i tried ROWNUM but as i understand it works only for unsorted result set.

SELECT rownum, a.lg_id, a.full_name, a.sort_order
  FROM activity_type_lang a
  where a.lg_id = 'en'
  order by a.full_name;

TIA

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

In addition to nesting the query, you can use an analytic function

SELECT row_number() OVER (ORDER BY a.full_name),
       lg_id,
       full_name,
       sort_order
  FROM activity_type_lang a
 WHERE a.lg_id = 'en'
 ORDER BY a.full_name

Using analytic functions also makes it easier if you want to change how ties are handled. You can replace ROW_NUMBER with RANK or DENSE_RANK.

share|improve this answer

Oh. Seems i've found already a solution.

    Select rownum, lg_id, full_name, sort_order from 
(SELECT a.lg_id, a.full_name, a.sort_order
      FROM activity_type_lang a
      where a.lg_id = 'en'
      order by a.full_name);
share|improve this answer

rownum is applied before ordering, so you have to rewrite your query like this: select rownum, xxx.* from ( SELECT a.lg_id, a.full_name, a.sort_order FROM activity_type_lang a where a.lg_id = 'en' order by a.full_name ) xxx;

share|improve this answer

Hello. I wonder how could i print a row number for sql statement where is using order. Currently i tried ROWNUM but as i understand it works only for unsorted result set.

To be clear (somebody might get it wrong). It does work (but not in the way you expect). The problem with it is that it "attaches" the ROWNUM before the sort and you get your records but not in consecutive ROWNUM records. Why? Because

The first record that meets the where criteria in a select statement is given rownum=1

This is really good example how select / order mechanism works.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.