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Given a function which produces a random integer in the range 1 to 5, write a function which produces a random integer in the range 1 to 7.

  1. What is a simple solution?
  2. What is an effective solution to reduce memory usage or run on a slower CPU?
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9  
Honest downvoters would comment why. This question doesn't suck - it exposes common fallacies about "random". –  Brent.Longborough Sep 26 '08 at 4:48
109  
I don't care if it was a homework question. It gave me food for thought. –  Brent.Longborough Sep 26 '08 at 5:12
9  
"if people want to leave comments, they can; forcing them won't achieve anything except prevent participation" –  mafu May 4 '09 at 5:46
14  
How come this guy has more reputation than me when he's just posted 2 homework questions (apart from the possibilities of my contributions to SO being crap)? –  Dave Arkell Jun 1 '09 at 14:22
37  
@Dave Arkell: Because of stackoverflow.com/questions/130654/…. Your questions are not silly enough. If you want to gain substantial reputation (do you really want it?), you need to ask or answer a silly or broad question, or something simple enough so that everyone can understand it. (In marketing terms, you need to aim at the mass market) –  Suma Jun 16 '09 at 11:14

65 Answers 65

Start with a random number between 1 and 5, then proceed by skipping rand5 items to the next number in modulo 7:

s = [ 0 ] * 7 
r = rand5()
for i in xrange(100000):
    s[r] += 1
    r = ( r + rand5() ) % 7 # a new random number
print s

Output:

[14211, 14325, 14312, 14257, 14289, 14291, 14315]
share|improve this answer

Here's mine, this attempts to recreate Math.random() from multiple rand5() function calls, reconstructing a unit interval (the output range of Math.random()) by re-constructing it with "weighted fractions"(?). Then using this random unit interval to produce a random integer between 1 and 7:

function rand5(){
  return Math.floor(Math.random()*5)+1;
}
function rand7(){
  var uiRandom=0;
  var div=1;
  for(var i=0; i<7; i++){
    div*=5;
    var term=(rand5()-1)/div;
    uiRandom+=term;
  }
  //return uiRandom;
  return Math.floor(uiRandom*7)+1; 
}

To paraphrase: We take a random integers between 0-4 (just rand5()-1) and multiply each result with 1/5, 1/25, 1/125, ... and then sum them together. It's similar to how binary weighted fractions work; I suppose instead, we'll call it a quinary (base-5) weighted fraction: Producing a number from 0 -- 0.999999 as a series of (1/5)^n terms.

Modifying the function to take any input/output random integer range should be trivial. And the code above can be optimized when rewritten as a closure.


Alternatively, we can also do this:

function rand5(){
  return Math.floor(Math.random()*5)+1;
}
function rand7(){
  var buffer=[];
  var div=1;
  for (var i=0; i<7; i++){
    buffer.push((rand5()-1).toString(5));
    div*=5;
  }
  var n=parseInt(buffer.join(""),5);
  var uiRandom=n/div;
  //return uiRandom;
  return Math.floor(uiRandom*7)+1; 
}

Instead of fiddling with constructing a quinary (base-5) weighted fractions, we'll actually make a quinary number and turn it into a fraction (0--0.9999... as before), then compute our random 1--7 digit from there.

Results for above (code snippet #2: 3 runs of 100,000 calls each):

1: 14263; 2: 14414; 3: 14249; 4: 14109; 5: 14217; 6: 14361; 7: 14387

1: 14205; 2: 14394; 3: 14238; 4: 14187; 5: 14384; 6: 14224; 7: 14368

1: 14425; 2: 14236; 3: 14334; 4: 14232; 5: 14160; 6: 14320; 7: 14293

share|improve this answer

First, I move ramdom5() on the 1 point 6 times, to get 7 random numbers. Second, I add 7 numbers to obtain common sum. Third, I get remainder of the division at 7. Last, I add 1 to get results from 1 till 7. This method gives an equal probability of getting numbers in the range from 1 to 7, with the exception of 1. 1 has a slightly higher probability.

public int random7(){
    Random random = new Random();
    //function (1 + random.nextInt(5)) is given
    int random1_5 = 1 + random.nextInt(5); // 1,2,3,4,5
    int random2_6 = 2 + random.nextInt(5); // 2,3,4,5,6
    int random3_7 = 3 + random.nextInt(5); // 3,4,5,6,7
    int random4_8 = 4 + random.nextInt(5); // 4,5,6,7,8
    int random5_9 = 5 + random.nextInt(5); // 5,6,7,8,9
    int random6_10 = 6 + random.nextInt(5); //6,7,8,9,10
    int random7_11 = 7 + random.nextInt(5); //7,8,9,10,11

    //sumOfRandoms is between 28 and 56
    int sumOfRandoms = random1_5 + random2_6 + random3_7 + 
                       random4_8 + random5_9 + random6_10 + random7_11;
    //result is number between 0 and 6, and
    //equals 0 if sumOfRandoms = 28 or 35 or 42 or 49 or 56 , 5 options
    //equals 1 if sumOfRandoms = 29 or 36 or 43 or 50, 4 options
    //equals 2 if sumOfRandoms = 30 or 37 or 44 or 51, 4 options
    //equals 3 if sumOfRandoms = 31 or 38 or 45 or 52, 4 options
    //equals 4 if sumOfRandoms = 32 or 39 or 46 or 53, 4 options
    //equals 5 if sumOfRandoms = 33 or 40 or 47 or 54, 4 options
    //equals 6 if sumOfRandoms = 34 or 41 or 48 or 55, 4 options
    //It means that the probabilities of getting numbers between 0 and 6 are almost equal.
    int result = sumOfRandoms % 7;
    //we should add 1 to move the interval [0,6] to the interval [1,7]
    return 1 + result;
}
share|improve this answer

Would be cool if someone could give me feedback on this one, I used the JUNIT without assert Pattern because it's easy and fast to get it running in Eclipse, I could also have just defined a main method. By the way, I am assuming rand5 gives values 0-4, adding 1 would make it 1-5, same with rand7... So the discussion should be on the solution, it's distribution, not on wether it goes from 0-4 or 1-5...

package random;

import java.util.Random;

import org.junit.Test;

public class RandomTest {


    @Test
    public void testName() throws Exception {
        long times = 100000000;
        int indexes[] = new int[7];
        for(int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
            int rand7 = rand7();
            indexes[rand7]++;
        }

        for(int i = 0; i < 7; i++)
            System.out.println("Value " + i + ": " + indexes[i]);
    }


    public int rand7() {
        return (rand5() + rand5() + rand5() + rand5() + rand5() + rand5() + rand5()) % 7;
    }


    public int rand5() {
        return new Random().nextInt(5);
    }


}

When I run it, I get this result:

Value 0: 14308087
Value 1: 14298303
Value 2: 14279731
Value 3: 14262533
Value 4: 14269749
Value 5: 14277560
Value 6: 14304037

This seems like a very fair distribution, doesn't it?

If I add rand5() less or more times (where the amount of times is not divisible by 7), the distribution clearly shows offsets. For instance, adding rand5() 3 times:

Value 0: 15199685
Value 1: 14402429
Value 2: 12795649
Value 3: 12796957
Value 4: 14402252
Value 5: 15202778
Value 6: 15200250

So, this would lead to the following:

public int rand(int range) {
    int randomValue = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < range; i++) {
        randomValue += rand5();
    }
    return randomValue % range;

}

And then, I could go further:

public static final int ORIGN_RANGE = 5;
public static final int DEST_RANGE  = 7;

@Test
public void testName() throws Exception {
    long times = 100000000;
    int indexes[] = new int[DEST_RANGE];
    for(int i = 0; i < times; i++) {
        int rand7 = convertRand(DEST_RANGE, ORIGN_RANGE);
        indexes[rand7]++;
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < DEST_RANGE; i++)
        System.out.println("Value " + i + ": " + indexes[i]);
}


public int convertRand(int destRange, int originRange) {
    int randomValue = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < destRange; i++) {
        randomValue += rand(originRange);
    }
    return randomValue % destRange;

}


public int rand(int range) {
    return new Random().nextInt(range);
}

I tried this replacing the destRange and originRange with various values (even 7 for ORIGIN and 13 for DEST), and I get this distribution:

Value 0: 7713763
Value 1: 7706552
Value 2: 7694697
Value 3: 7695319
Value 4: 7688617
Value 5: 7681691
Value 6: 7674798
Value 7: 7680348
Value 8: 7685286
Value 9: 7683943
Value 10: 7690283
Value 11: 7699142
Value 12: 7705561

What I can conclude from here is that you can change any random to anyother by suming the origin random "destination" times. This will get a kind of gaussian distribution (being the middle values more likely, and the edge values more uncommon). However, the modulus of destination seems to distribute itself evenly across this gaussian distribution... It would be great to have feedback from a mathematician...

What is cool is that the cost is 100% predictable and constant, whereas other solutions cause a small probability of infinite loop...

share|improve this answer

The simple solution has been well covered: take two random5 samples for one random7 result and do it over if the result is outside the range that generates a uniform distribution. If your goal is to reduce the number of calls to random5 this is extremely wasteful - the average number of calls to random5 for each random7 output is 2.38 rather than 2 due to the number of thrown away samples.

You can do better by using more random5 inputs to generate more than one random7 output at a time. For results calculated with a 31-bit integer, the optimum comes when using 12 calls to random5 to generate 9 random7 outputs, taking an average of 1.34 calls per output. It's efficient because only 2018983 out of 244140625 results need to be scrapped, or less than 1%.

Demo in Python:

def random5():
    return random.randint(1, 5)

def random7gen(n):
    count = 0
    while n > 0:
        samples = 6 * 7**9
        while samples >= 6 * 7**9:
            samples = 0
            for i in range(12):
                samples = samples * 5 + random5() - 1
                count += 1
        samples //= 6
        for outputs in range(9):
            yield samples % 7 + 1, count
            samples //= 7
            count = 0
            n -= 1
            if n == 0: break

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> Counter(x for x,i in random7gen(10000000))
Counter({2: 1430293, 4: 1429298, 1: 1428832, 7: 1428571, 3: 1428204, 5: 1428134, 6: 1426668})
>>> sum(i for x,i in random7gen(10000000)) / 10000000.0
1.344606
share|improve this answer

Here is an answer taking advantage of features in C++ 11

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <ostream>
#include <random>

int main()
{
    std::random_device rd;
    unsigned long seed = rd();
    std::cout << "seed = " << seed << std::endl;

    std::mt19937 engine(seed);

    std::uniform_int_distribution<> dist(1, 5);
    auto rand5 = std::bind(dist, engine);

    const int n = 20;
    for (int i = 0; i != n; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << rand5() << " ";
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    // Use a lambda expression to define rand7
    auto rand7 = [&rand5]()->int
    {
        for (int result = 0; ; result = 0)
        {
            // Take advantage of the fact that
            // 5**6 = 15625 = 15624 + 1 = 7 * (2232) + 1.
            // So we only have to discard one out of every 15625 numbers generated.

            // Generate a 6-digit number in base 5
            for (int i = 0; i != 6; ++i)
            {
                result = 5 * result + (rand5() - 1);
            }

            // result is in the range [0, 15625)
            if (result == 15625 - 1)
            {
                // Discard this number
                continue;
            }

            // We now know that result is in the range [0, 15624), a range that can
            // be divided evenly into 7 buckets guaranteeing uniformity
            result /= 2232;
            return 1 + result;
        }
    };

    for (int i = 0; i != n; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << rand7() << " ";
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
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Given a function which produces a random integer in the range 1 to 5 rand5(), write a function which produces a random integer in the range 1 to 7 rand7()

In my proposed solution, I only call rand5 once only

Real Solution

float rand7()
{
    return (rand5() * 7.0) / 5.0 ;
}

The distribution here is scaled, so it depends directly on the distribution of rand5

Integer Solution

int rand7()
{
    static int prev = 1;

    int cur = rand5();

    int r = cur * prev; // 1-25

    float f = r / 4.0; // 0.25-6.25

    f = f - 0.25; // 0-6

    f = f + 1.0; // 1-7

    prev = cur;

    return (int)f;
}

The distribution here depends on the series rand7(i) ~ rand5(i) * rand5(i-1)

with rand7(0) ~ rand5(0) * 1

share|improve this answer

I think y'all are overthinking this. Doesn't this simple solution work?

int rand7(void)
{
    static int startpos = 0;
    startpos = (startpos+5) % (5*7);
    return (((startpos + rand5()-1)%7)+1);
}
share|improve this answer

This solution was inspired by Rob McAfee.
However it doesn't need a loop and the result is a uniform distribution:

// Returns 1-5
var rnd5 = function(){
   return parseInt(Math.random() * 5, 10) + 1;
}
// Helper
var lastEdge = 0;
// Returns 1-7
var rnd7 = function () {
  var map = [
     [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ],
     [ 6, 7, 1, 2, 3 ],
     [ 4, 5, 6, 7, 1 ],
     [ 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ],
     [ 7, 0, 0, 0, 0 ]
  ];
  var result = map[rnd5() - 1][rnd5() - 1];
  if (result > 0) {
    return result;
  }
  lastEdge++;
  if (lastEdge > 7 ) {
    lastEdge = 1;
  }
  return lastEdge;
};

// Test the a uniform distribution
results = {}; for(i=0; i < 700000;i++) { var rand = rnd7(); results[rand] = results[rand] ? results[rand] + 1 : 1;} 
console.log(results)

Result: [1: 99560, 2: 99932, 3: 100355, 4: 100262, 5: 99603, 6: 100062, 7: 100226]

jsFiddle

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There are a lot of solutions here that do not produce a uniform distribution and many comments pointing that out, but the the question does not state that as a requirement. The simplest solution is:

int rand_7() { return rand_5(); }

A random integer in the range 1 - 5 is clearly in the range 1 - 7. Well, technically, the simplest solution is to return a constant, but that's too trivial.

However, I think the existence of the rand_5 function is a red herring. Suppose the question was asked as "produce a uniformly distributed pseudo-random number generator with integer output in the range 1 - 7". That's a simple problem (not technically simple, but already solved, so you can look it up.)

On the other hand, if the question is interpreted to mean that you actually have a truly random number generator for integers in the range 1 - 5 (not pseudo random), then the solution is:

1) examine the rand_5 function
2) understand how it works
3) profit
share|improve this answer

This solution doesn't waste any entropy and gives the first available truly random number in range. With each iteration the probability of not getting an answer is provably decreased. The probability of getting an answer in N iterations is the probability that a random number between 0 and max (5^N) will be smaller than the largest multiple of seven in that range (max-max%7). Must iterate at least twice. But that's necessarily true for all solutions.

int random7() {
  range = 1;
  remainder = 0;

  while (1) {
    remainder = remainder * 5 + random5() - 1;
    range = range * 5;

    limit = range - (range % 7);
    if (remainder < limit) return (remainder % 7) + 1;

    remainder = remainder % 7;
    range = range % 7;
  }
}

Numerically equivalent to:

r5=5;
num=random5()-1;
while (1) {
   num=num*5+random5()-1;
   r5=r5*5;
   r7=r5-r5%7;
   if (num<r7) return num%7+1;
}

The first code calculates it in modulo form. The second code is just plain math. Or I made a mistake somewhere. :-)

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This is similiarly to @RobMcAfee except that I use magic number instead of 2 dimensional array.

int rand7() {
    int m = 1203068;
    int r = (m >> (rand5() - 1) * 5 + rand5() - 1) & 7;

    return (r > 0) ? r : rand7();
}
share|improve this answer
function rand7() {
    while (true) { //lowest base 5 random number > 7 reduces memory
        int num = (rand5()-1)*5 + rand5()-1;
    if (num < 21)  // improves performance
        return 1 + num%7;
    }
}

Python code:

from random import randint
def rand7():
    while(True):
        num = (randint(1, 5)-1)*5 + randint(1, 5)-1
        if num < 21:
                return 1 + num%7

Test distribution for 100000 runs:

>>> rnums = []
>>> for _ in range(100000):
    rnums.append(rand7())
>>> {n:rnums.count(n) for n in set(rnums)}
{1: 15648, 2: 15741, 3: 15681, 4: 15847, 5: 15642, 6: 15806, 7: 15635}
share|improve this answer

This expression is sufficient to get random integers between 1 - 7

int j = ( rand5()*2 + 4 ) % 7 + 1;
share|improve this answer
2  
As long as you don't need any 3's or 5's. –  dansalmo Dec 18 '13 at 21:03

We are using the convention rand(n) -> [0, n - 1] here

From many of the answer I read, they provide either uniformity or halt guarantee, but not both (adam rosenfeld second answer might).

It is, however, possible to do so. We basically have this distribution:

rand5_proba.png

This leaves us a hole in the distribution over [0-6]: 5 and 6 have no probability of ocurrence. Imagine now we try to fill the hole it by shifting the probability distribution and summing.

Indeed, we can the initial distribution with itself shifted by one, and repeating by summing the obtained distribution with the initial one shifted by two, then three and so on, until 7, not included (we covered the whole range). This is shown on the following figure. The order of the colors, corresponding to the steps, is blue -> green -> cyan -> white -> magenta -> yellow -> red.

fig_moving_average_proba.png

Because each slot is covered by 5 of the 7 shifted distributions (shift varies from 0 to 6), and because we assume the random numbers are independent from one ran5() call to another, we obtain

p(x) = 5 / 35 = 1 / 7       for all x in [0, 6]

This means that, given 7 independent random numbers from ran5(), we can compute a random number with uniform probability in the [0-6] range. In fact, the ran5() probability distribution does not even need to be uniform, as long as the samples are independent (so the distribution stays the same from trial to trial). Also, this is valid for other numbers than 5 and 7.

This gives us the following python function:

def rand_range_transform(rands):
    """
    returns a uniform random number in [0, len(rands) - 1]
    if all r in rands are independent random numbers from the same uniform distribution
    """
    return sum((x + i) for i, x in enumerate(rands)) % len(rands) # a single modulo outside the sum is enough in modulo arithmetic

This can be used like this:

rand5 = lambda : random.randrange(5)

def rand7():
    return rand_range_transform([rand5() for _ in range(7)])

If we call rand7() 70000 times, we can get:

max: 6 min: 0 mean: 2.99711428571 std: 2.00194697049
0:  10019
1:  10016
2:  10071
3:  10044
4:  9775
5:  10042
6:  10033

This is good, although far from perfect. The fact is, one of our assumption is most likely false in this implementation: we use a PRNG, and as such, the result of the next call is dependent from the last result.

That said, using a truly random source of numbers, the output should also be truly random. And this algorithm terminates in every case.

But this comes with a cost: we need 7 calls to rand5() for a single rand7() call.

share|improve this answer

Here's my general implementation, to generate a uniform in the range [0,N-1] given a uniform generator in the range [0,B-1].

public class RandomUnif {

    public static final int BASE_NUMBER = 5;

    private static Random rand = new Random();

    /** given generator, returns uniform integer in the range 0.. BASE_NUMBER-1
    public static int randomBASE() {
        return rand.nextInt(BASE_NUMBER);
    }

    /** returns uniform integer in the range 0..n-1 using randomBASE() */
    public static int randomUnif(int n) {
        int rand, factor;
        if( n <= 1 ) return 0;
        else if( n == BASE_NUMBER ) return randomBASE();
        if( n < BASE_NUMBER ) {
            factor = BASE_NUMBER / n;
            do
                rand = randomBASE() / factor;
            while(rand >= n);
            return rand;
        } else {
            factor = (n - 1) / BASE_NUMBER + 1;
            do {
                rand = factor * randomBASE() + randomUnif(factor);
            } while(rand >= n);
            return rand;
        }
    }
}

Not spectaculary efficient, but general and compact. Mean calls to base generator:

 n  calls
 2  1.250 
 3  1.644 
 4  1.252 
 5  1.000 
 6  3.763 
 7  3.185 
 8  2.821 
 9  2.495 
10  2.250 
11  3.646 
12  3.316 
13  3.060 
14  2.853 
15  2.650 
16  2.814 
17  2.644 
18  2.502 
19  2.361 
20  2.248 
21  2.382 
22  2.277 
23  2.175 
24  2.082 
25  2.000 
26  5.472 
27  5.280 
28  5.119 
29  4.899 
share|improve this answer

Why won't this work? Other then the one extra call to rand5()?

i = rand5() + rand5() + (rand5() - 1) //Random number between 1 and 14

i = i % 7 + 1;
share|improve this answer
int rand7()
{
    return ( rand5() + (rand5()%3) );
}
  1. rand5() - Returns values from 1-5
  2. rand5()%3 - Returns values from 0-2
  3. So, when summing up the total value will be between 1-7
share|improve this answer
rand7() = (rand5()+rand5()+rand5()+rand5()+rand5()+rand5()+rand5())%7+1

Edit: That doesn't quite work. It's off by about 2 parts in 1000 (assuming a perfect rand5). The buckets get:

value   Count  Error%
1       11158  -0.0035
2       11144  -0.0214
3       11144  -0.0214
4       11158  -0.0035
5       11172  +0.0144
6       11177  +0.0208
7       11172  +0.0144

By switching to a sum of

n   Error%
10  +/- 1e-3,
12  +/- 1e-4,
14  +/- 1e-5,
16  +/- 1e-6,
...
28  +/- 3e-11

seems to gain an order of magnitude for every 2 added

BTW: the table of errors above was not generated via sampling but by the following recurrence relation:

p[x,n] is the number ways output=x can happen given n calls to rand5.

  p[1,1] ... p[5,1] = 1
  p[6,1] ... p[7,1] = 0

  p[1,n] = p[7,n-1] + p[6,n-1] + p[5,n-1] + p[4,n-1] + p[3,n-1]
  p[2,n] = p[1,n-1] + p[7,n-1] + p[6,n-1] + p[5,n-1] + p[4,n-1]
  p[3,n] = p[2,n-1] + p[1,n-1] + p[7,n-1] + p[6,n-1] + p[5,n-1]
  p[4,n] = p[3,n-1] + p[2,n-1] + p[1,n-1] + p[7,n-1] + p[6,n-1]
  p[5,n] = p[4,n-1] + p[3,n-1] + p[2,n-1] + p[1,n-1] + p[7,n-1]
  p[6,n] = p[5,n-1] + p[4,n-1] + p[3,n-1] + p[2,n-1] + p[1,n-1]
  p[7,n] = p[6,n-1] + p[5,n-1] + p[4,n-1] + p[3,n-1] + p[2,n-1]
share|improve this answer
4  
This is not a uniform distribution. It's very close to uniform, but not perfectly uniform. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 15 '09 at 18:06
3  
Not a uniform distribution. –  Jason S Jan 24 '09 at 20:07
33  
The proof that it's not uniform is simple: there are 5^7 possible ways the randomness can go, and as 5^7 is not a multiple of 7, it's not possible that all 7 sums are equally likely. (Basically, it boils down to 7 being relatively prime to 5, or equivalently 1/7 not being a terminating decimal in base 5.) In fact it's not even the "most uniform" possible under this constraint: direct computation shows that of the 5^7=78125 sums, the number of times you get values 1 to 7 is {1: 11145, 2: 11120, 3: 11120, 4: 11145, 5: 11190, 6: 11215, 7: 11190}. –  ShreevatsaR Apr 30 '09 at 16:05

First thing came on my mind is this. But i have no idea whether its uniformly distributed. Implemented in python

import random

def rand5():

return random.randint(1,5)

def rand7():

return ( ( (rand5() -1) * rand5() ) %7 )+1

share|improve this answer

Why don't you just divide by 5 and multiply by 7, and then round? (Granted, you would have to use floating-point no.s)

It's much easier and more reliable (really?) than the other solutions. E.g. in Python:

def ranndomNo7():
    import random
    rand5 = random.randint(4)    # Produces range: [0, 4]
    rand7 = int(rand5 / 5 * 7)   # /5, *7, +0.5 and floor()
    return rand7

Wasn't that easy?

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3  
You still only end up with 5 distinct integers, not 7. You just have changed the 5 integers that are generated –  demongolem Jun 8 '12 at 16:59

Assuming rand gives equal weighting to all bits, then masks with the upper bound.

int i = rand(5) ^ (rand(5) & 2);

rand(5) can only return: 1b, 10b, 11b, 100b, 101b. You only need to concern yourself with sometimes setting the 2 bit.

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extern int r5();

int r7() {
    return ((r5() & 0x01) << 2 ) | ((r5() & 0x01) << 1 ) | (r5() & 0x01);
}
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Here's what I've found:

  1. Random5 produces a range from 1~5, randomly distributed
  2. If we run it 3 times and add them together we'll get a range of 3~15, randomly distributed
  3. Perform arithmetic on the 3~15 range
    1. (3~15) - 1 = (2~14)
    2. (2~14)/2 = (1~7)

Then we get a range of 1~7, which is the Random7 we're looking for.

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2  
Random7 is not uniformally distributed. Take step 2. What are the odds of 3 being generated? 1/125. How about 4? 3/125. Assuming integer division in step 3, these are the only 2 ways of generating 1 in Random7. That only happens 4/125 of the time. Now maybe my mistake is using the word uniformally. –  demongolem Jun 8 '12 at 17:09

Algorithm:

7 can be represented in a sequence of 3 bits

Use rand(5) to randomly fill each bit with 0 or 1.
For e.g: call rand(5) and

if the result is 1 or 2, fill the bit with 0
if the result is 4 or 5, fill the bit with 1
if the result is 3 , then ignore and do it again (rejection)

This way we can fill 3 bits randomly with 0/1 and thus get a number from 1-7.

EDIT: This seems like the simplest and most efficient answer, so here's some code for it:

public static int random_7() {
    int returnValue = 0;
    while (returnValue == 0) {
        for (int i = 1; i <= 3; i++) {
            returnValue = (returnValue << 1) + random_5_output_2();
        }
    }
    return returnValue;
}

private static int random_5_output_2() {
    while (true) {
        int flip = random_5();

        if (flip < 3) {
            return 0;
        }
        else if (flip > 3) {
            return 1;
        }
    }
}
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1  
There always the faint spectre of the halting problem, since a poor random number generator could just generate a lot of threes at some point. –  Alex North-Keys Apr 18 '12 at 13:31

If we consider the additional constraint of trying to give the most efficient answer i.e one that given an input stream, I, of uniformly distributed integers of length m from 1-5 outputs a stream O, of uniformly distributed integers from 1-7 of the longest length relative to m, say L(m).

The simplest way to analyse this is to treat the streams I and O as 5-ary and 7-ary numbers respectively. This is achieved by the main answer's idea of taking the stream a1, a2, a3,... -> a1+5*a2+5^2*a3+.. and similarly for stream O.

Then if we take a section of the input stream of length m choose n s.t. 5^m-7^n=c where c>0 and is as small as possible. Then there is a uniform map from the input stream of length m to integers from 1 to 5^m and another uniform map from integers from 1 to 7^n to the output stream of length n where we may have to lose a few cases from the input stream when the mapped integer exceeds 7^n.

So this gives a value for L(m) of around m (log5/log7) which is approximately .82m.

The difficulty with the above analysis is the equation 5^m-7^n=c which is not easy to solve exactly and the case where the uniform value from 1 to 5^m exceeds 7^n and we lose efficiency.

The question is how close to the best possible value of m (log5/log7) can be attain. For example when this number approaches close to an integer can we find a way to achieve this exact integral number of output values?

If 5^m-7^n=c then from the input stream we effectively generate a uniform random number from 0 to (5^m)-1 and don't use any values higher than 7^n. However these values can be rescued and used again. They effectively generate a uniform sequence of numbers from 1 to 5^m-7^n. So we can then try to use these and convert them into 7-ary numbers so that we can create more output values.

If we let T7(X) to be the average length of the output sequence of random(1-7) integers derived from a uniform input of size X, and assuming that 5^m=7^n0+7^n1+7^n2+...+7^nr+s, s<7.

Then T7(5^m)=n0x7^n0/5^m + ((5^m-7^n0)/5^m) T7(5^m-7^n0) since we have a length no sequence with probability 7^n0/5^m with a residual of length 5^m-7^n0 with probability (5^m-7^n0)/5^m).

If we just keep substituting we obtain:

T7(5^m) = n0x7^n0/5^m + n1x7^n1/5^m + ... + nrx7^nr/5^m  = (n0x7^n0 + n1x7^n1 + ... + nrx7^nr)/5^m

Hence

L(m)=T7(5^m)=(n0x7^n0 + n1x7^n1 + ... + nrx7^nr)/(7^n0+7^n1+7^n2+...+7^nr+s)

Another way of putting this is:

If 5^m has 7-ary representation `a0+a1*7 + a2*7^2 + a3*7^3+...+ar*7^r
Then L(m) = (a1*7 + 2a2*7^2 + 3a3*7^3+...+rar*7^r)/(a0+a1*7 + a2*7^2 + a3*7^3+...+ar*7^r)

The best possible case is my original one above where 5^m=7^n+s, where s<7.

Then T7(5^m) = nx(7^n)/(7^n+s) = n+o(1) = m (Log5/Log7)+o(1) as before.

The worst case is when we can only find k and s.t 5^m = kx7+s.

Then T7(5^m) = 1x(k.7)/(k.7+s) = 1+o(1)

Other cases are somewhere inbetween. It would be interesting to see how well we can do for very large m, i.e. how good can we get the error term:

T7(5^m) = m (Log5/Log7)+e(m)

It seems impossible to achieve e(m) = o(1) in general but hopefully we can prove e(m)=o(m).

The whole thing then rests on the distribution of the 7-ary digits of 5^m for various values of m.

I'm sure there is a lot of theory out there that covers this I may have a look and report back at some point.

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I thought of an interesting solution to this problem and wanted to share it.

function rand7() {

    var returnVal = 4;

    for (var n=0; n<3; n++) {
        var rand = rand5();

        if (rand==1||rand==2){
            returnVal+=1;
        }
        else if (rand==3||rand==4) {
            returnVal-=1;
        }
    }

    return returnVal;
}

I built a test function that loops through rand7() 10,000 times, sums up all of the return values, and divides it by 10,000. If rand7() is working correctly, our calculated average should be 4 - for example, (1+2+3+4+5+6+7 / 7) = 4. After doing multiple tests, the average is indeed right at 4 :)

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2  
if you got all ones and sevens the average could be 4. –  dqhendricks Apr 1 '11 at 15:10

in php

function rand1to7() {
    do {
        $output_value = 0;
        for ($i = 0; $i < 28; $i++) {
            $output_value += rand1to5();
        }
    while ($output_value != 140);
    $output_value -= 12;
    return floor($output_value / 16);
}

loops to produce a random number between 16 and 127, divides by sixteen to create a float between 1 and 7.9375, then rounds down to get an int between 1 and 7. if I am not mistaken, there is a 16/112 chance of getting any one of the 7 outcomes.

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rand25() =5*(rand5()-1) + rand5()

rand7() { 
   while(true) {
       int r = rand25();
       if (r < 21) return r%3;         
   }
}

Why this works: probability that the loop will run forever is 0.

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For values 0-7 you have the following:

0 000
1 001
2 010
3 011
4 100
5 101
6 110
7 111

From bitwise from left to right Rand5() has p(1) = {2/5, 2/5, 3/5}. So if we complement those probability distributions (~Rand5()) we should be able to use that to produce our number. I'll try to report back later with a solution. Anyone have any thoughts?

R

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