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I need to write a Haskell program that will generate a diamond output recursively. Here is some sample output for given input

input : 1
output :

 *
* *
 *

input : 2
output :

    *
   * *
    *
 *     *
* *   * *
 *     *
    *
   * *
    *

input : 3
output :

             *             
            * *             
             *              
          *     *           
         * *   * *          
          *     *           
             *              
            * *             
             *              

    *                 *    
   * *               * *   
    *                 *    
 *     *           *     * 
* *   * *         * *   * *
 *     *           *     * 
    *                 *    
   * *               * *   
    *                 *    
             *             
            * *             
             *              
          *     *           
         * *   * *          
          *     *           
             *              
            * *             
             *     

I wrote following functions:

next 0 = [1,0,1]
next n = map (+3^n) (next (n-1)) ++ next (n-1) ++ map (+3^n) (next (n-1))
lpad n = map (++"*") (zipWith ($) (map (take)(next (n-1))) ((repeat(repeat ' '))))
pretty n = putStrLn $ intercalate "\n" $ lpad n

which gives following outputs:

pretty 1

 *
*
 *

pretty 2

    *
   *
    *
 *
*
 *
    *
   *
    *

Can anyone help me with the remaining halves? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
This was asked in an exam in PUCSD. (Pune university computer science department). –  user1892530 Dec 10 '12 at 18:33
    
Its me Master . –  user1892530 Dec 10 '12 at 18:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For n==0, next n describes the whole picture up to mirroring. This is not the case anymore for greater n. So, in a first step, we change the next function to output a symmetric picture:

mmap = map . map

next :: Int -> [[Int]]
next 0 = [[1],[0,2],[1]]
next n = sn ++ map (\a -> a ++ map (+2*3^n) a) nn ++ sn
  where
    nn = next (n - 1)
    sn = mmap (+3^n) nn

Now, next n describes the positions of all stars. To print them, we first compute the relative distances.

diffs :: [Int] -> [Int]
diffs (x:xs) = x: diffs' x (xs)
  where
    diffs' x (y:ys) = y - x - 1 : diffs' y ys
    diffs' _ [] = []
diffs [] = []

lpad :: Int -> [[Char]]
lpad = map (concatMap $ \n -> replicate n ' ' ++ "*") . map diffs . next'

Applied to one line, diffs returns the list of the number of spaces we need to put before each star and lpad generates the picture from that. Print it as before:

pretty :: Int -> IO ()
pretty n = putStrLn $ unlines $ lpad n
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good solution to the problem as asked, and deserves more upvotes! –  AndrewC Dec 9 '12 at 16:15

This is derived from AndrewC's solution. The space blocks are recursively generated and I prefer to use operators to make the code clearer:

diamond
    = putStr
    . unlines
    . fst
    . (iterate f (["*"], [" "]) !!)
  where
    f (d, e)
        = (  e + d + e
         ++  d + e + d
         ++  e + d + e
          ,  e + e + e
         ++  e + e + e
         ++  e + e + e
          )

    (+) = zipWith (++)

A generalization. If we would like to have this:

             +             
            - -            
             +             
          -     -          
         + +   + +         
          -     -          
             +             
            - -            
             +             
    -                 -    
   + +               + +   
    -                 -    
 +     +           +     + 
- -   - -         - -   - -
 +     +           +     + 
    -                 -    
   + +               + +   
    -                 -    
             +             
            - -            
             +             
          -     -          
         + +   + +         
          -     -          
             +             
            - -            
             +             

then the solution is star 3 where

star
    = putStr
    . unlines
    . (\(d, p, e) -> d)
    . (iterate f (["-"], ["+"], [" "]) !!)
  where
    f (d, p, e)
        = (  e + p + e
         ++  d + e + d
         ++  e + p + e
          ,  e + d + e
         ++  p + e + p
         ++  e + d + e
          ,  e + e + e
         ++  e + e + e
         ++  e + e + e
          )

    (+) = zipWith (++)
share|improve this answer
    
I agree, infixes are great here. Though many programmers would not much like the shadowing of +, perhaps something like % would be better (default fixity infixl 9 would in this case be equivalent to +'s infixl 6; and redeclaring it infixr 6 (or infixr 4, for that matter) would actually make it a bit more efficient). –  leftaroundabout Jan 12 '13 at 11:47
    
% is used in Data.Ratio. I don't mind shadowing for small examples like this. –  Péter Diviánszky Jan 20 '13 at 9:18

I liked the task, so I wrote an alternative solution.

We could build it up, a bit like you would with a pretty printer. Look into the pretty package to take these ideas and use them properly, but let's stick to plain old [String] for this.

First let's make a blank grid

blank :: Int -> [String]
blank n = replicate (3^n) $ replicate (3^n) ' '

Then let's define a diamond.

diamond :: Int -> [String]
diamond 0 = ["*"]
diamond n = let 
        o = diamond (n-1) 
        x = blank (n-1) in
    joinMatrix [[x,o,x]
               ,[o,x,o]
               ,[x,o,x]]

But how can we join this matrix of [String] together? First get all the Strings that should be concatenated together next to each other instead of under each other using transpose, then concat them all:

joinLine :: [[String]] -> [String]
joinLine = map concat.transpose

To do that to a whole matrix we need to join the lines on each row, then concat all the lines together into one list of lines:

joinMatrix :: [[[String]]] -> [String]
joinMatrix = concat.map joinLine

helper functions for printing:

put = mapM_ putStrLn
d n = put $ diamond n

You could argue that the numerical solution is more efficient, and it is, but d 4 is the largest that fits on my screen and isn't slow. You could also argue that this solution is clearer.

*Main> d 0
*
*Main> d 1
 * 
* *
 * 
*Main>  d 2
    *    
   * *   
    *    
 *     * 
* *   * *
 *     * 
    *    
   * *   
    *    

(It works for higher n too, but they would make this post unnecessarily long on the page.)

share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget to vote for cebewee's good answer! –  AndrewC Dec 9 '12 at 16:16
    
Thanks :) I very much like how in your approach, you only need to encode the diamond once, whereas in my approach, there are two diamonds: Once in next 0, and once in next n. –  Lars Noschinski Dec 10 '12 at 9:28

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