Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Case 1

class Program {
    static final int var;

    static {
        Program.var = 8;  // Compilation error
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int i;
        i = Program.var;
        System.out.println(Program.var);
    }
}

Case 2

class Program {
    static final int var;

    static {
        var = 8;  //OK
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(Program.var);
    }
}

Why does Case 1 cause a compilation error?

share|improve this question
    
Case 2 works, so why care? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 8 '12 at 14:58
2  
Very tricky and good question, giving work to brain now.. :) –  Pradeep Simha Dec 8 '12 at 15:05
2  
Great Interview question. –  Rohit Jain Dec 8 '12 at 15:11
5  
@RohitJain I would not call that a great interview question to be honest: you can't draw any conclusions on the level of a programmer based on whether he does or does not know the answer to that question! –  assylias Dec 11 '12 at 21:45
8  
This is one of the most useless questions that I have ever heard :) I do not understand why ppl try to make compilers out of programmers. I would better ask about Balanced Search Trees and Bloom Filters :) –  Tim Dec 11 '12 at 23:05
show 7 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 35 down vote accepted

The JLS holds the answer (note the bold statement):

Similarly, every blank final variable must be assigned at most once; it must be definitely unassigned when an assignment to it occurs. Such an assignment is defined to occur if and only if either the simple name of the variable (or, for a field, its simple name qualified by this) occurs on the left hand side of an assignment operator. [§16]

This means that the 'simple name' must be used when assigning static final variables - i.e. the var name without any qualifiers.

share|improve this answer
2  
What's the rationale? –  djechlin Dec 8 '12 at 15:09
7  
@djechlin - the rationale is 1) this simplifies the specification and 2) ThisClass.someFinal = value; is an obscure and unnecessary alternative for someFinal = value;; i.e. there is no need to support it. –  Stephen C Dec 8 '12 at 15:25
5  
@coders The class is not available by name until all initialisation is complete, so Program (by that name) does not exist until the static initialiser has been completed. –  xagyg Dec 8 '12 at 15:29
5  
@xagyg.. I'm afraid that is not the reason. Class is always first loaded and then the initialization process takes place. A static variable is attached to a class only, so it doesn't make sense that we can't use class name. You can yourself see it in practice. Just remove the final keyword from the variable, and the 1st code will compile fine. –  Rohit Jain Dec 8 '12 at 16:13
5  
@StephenC: It actually complicates the spec since it's an exception from the general access rules for static variables. The sentence in bold could have been omitted without this special rule. I assume the rationale for this might rather be that it simply had been implemented this way in an earlier compiler and then made it into the spec. There are a few other rules in later versions of the language spec where existing slightly obcure behaviour of the compiler was explicitely defined to be correct. –  x4u Dec 8 '12 at 17:42
show 4 more comments

Apparently this is a cheap syntactic trick to limit definite (un)assignment analysis within the class itself.

If the field is syntactically qualified with a class name, the code is usually in another class, where the analysis cannot reach.

This trick fails in your example. Other examples of oddity:

static class A
{
    static final int a;
    static
    {
        // System.out.println(a); // illegal
        System.out.println(A.a);  // compiles!
        a = 1;
    }
}

If they had more resources, they probably would've made a finer rule. But we can't change spec now.

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, I think the spec could be changed without causing problems because allowing Program.var does not make any currently valid program code invalid, i.e. it is a compatible change, or am I wrong? –  siegi Dec 11 '12 at 21:58
    
you are probably right. I don't remember why I said that. –  irreputable Dec 12 '12 at 1:22
    
:-D no problem, just thought I'm missing something... Thanks for the answer! –  siegi Dec 12 '12 at 6:56
    
@siegi: Expanding the class of programs which the compiler accepts will increase the amount of fielded code which won't be usable with older installations of the compiler. If the fielded code won't work on older compilers because it's using valuable new language features that the old compiler doesn't understand, that's an acceptable trade-off, it is is a trade-off. Allowing new syntactic forms without a major advantage will impose costs to owners of old installations, while offering them little in return. –  supercat Oct 28 '13 at 23:09
    
@supercat: Of course you are right, changing the language without much benefit is not good. On the other hand: If the language change coincides with a new major version (e.g. Java 6 to Java 7) you need a new compiler and runtime environment anyway, at least if you want to use any of the new features or any library compiled for the new version… –  siegi Nov 29 '13 at 16:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.