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How do you write a regular expression that matches a numeric range from 0 or 000 to 180 ?

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1  
regular-expressions.info/numericranges.html is a very useful article –  Bergi Mar 14 '13 at 17:13
    
I believe you can use this package https://github.com/dimka665/range-regex. It already support negative values. The current code is not updated, so you'll have to download it from that github resource. –  swdev Jun 10 at 8:35

10 Answers 10

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The easiest way for this would be to parse the string as a number and look for the number to be in the proper range.

To do this with pure regex you need to identify the pattern and write it out:

^(0?[0-9]{1,2}|1[0-7][0-9]|180)$

This has three alternatives: one for single- and two-digit numbers (allowing leading zeroes), where each digit can be anything from 0 to 9. And another one that specifies what range of digits is allowed for each digit in a three-digit number. In this case, this means that the first digit needs to be 1, the second between 0 and 7 and the last one may be anything. The third alternative is just for the number 180 which didn't fit nicely into the pattern elsewhere.

A more straightforward approach might be

^(0{0,2}[0-9]|0?[1-9][0-9]|1[0-7][0-9]|180)$

which just alternates for each tricky numeric range there might be.

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This does the trick. As you also mentioned it has to match 3 digit numbers as 001, 010, 012 and so on which this does. Thank you! –  Morten Sep 4 '09 at 8:33

I don't think regex is the right choice for this. Have you tried parsing the value? If you have to use regex I would match \d{1,3} parse the string and then validate the number in code.

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8  
+1 The other answers had at least one bug each, that's why it's not worth using RE for these tasks. –  soulmerge Sep 4 '09 at 8:31
3  
Two bugs even :( but yes, I fundamentally agree. –  Joey Sep 4 '09 at 8:33
1  
In every other context it might have been easier to parse a value, but it's used in a larger regex which passes a coordinate like 54°11'56.234'' –  Morten Sep 4 '09 at 8:35
3  
Well, in that case capture each individual part of the coordinate in a capture group and validate them afterwards. –  Joey Sep 4 '09 at 8:47
1  
This is the right answer in my opinion. People who try to solve these thing with pure REs are doing themselves (and the people that come after them) a disservice. –  paxdiablo Sep 4 '09 at 8:48

There is an online utility to generate these at UtilityMill.com For your question, this returns:

0*([0-9]{1,2}|1[0-7][0-9]|180)
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As a general rule, I wouldn't trust a regex written by a program. My experiences with RegexBuddy have shown that it is not my "buddy," nor can it write decent regular expressions. –  Chris Lutz Sep 4 '09 at 8:51
    
This one is correct, though. Although it allows for arbitrarily many leading zeros. –  Joey Sep 4 '09 at 9:20
    
@paul-mcguire is it possible to ignore commas if user try to enter values like 1,000? –  Vyache Jul 9 at 20:28
    
I have this regex: ^0*(([1-9][0-9\,]{0,5})|10[0-9\,]{5}|110000)$ I'm trying to match 110,000 values. –  Vyache Jul 9 at 20:53
    
I got a solution. ^0*(110,?000|((10[0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|[1-9]),?[0-9]{3})|[1-9]{1,3})$ –  Vyache Jul 10 at 16:18

The recently released rgxg command line tool generates regular expressions that match a specific number range:

$ rgxg range -Z 0 180
(180|1[0-7][0-9]|0?[0-9]{1,2})

For more information, see http://rgxg.sf.net.

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Cool, thanks for this! –  likeitlikeit Apr 26 '13 at 11:58

My two cents:

Anyone posting an answer to this question should have tested their regex with AT LEAST the following inputs:

Should match: 0, 00, 000, 5, 05, 005, 95, 095, 180

Should NOT match: 0000, 0095, 181, 190

I think what Johannes Rössel wrote is about as good as you'll get:

^(0?[0-9]{1,2}|1[0-7][0-9]|180)$
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1  
PowerShell helps for validating: -20..200|%{$_;"{0:00}"-f$_;"{0:000}"-f$_}|%{if ($_-match"^(0?[0-9]{1,2}|1[0-7][0-9]|180)$"){Write-Host -fore green $_}else{Write-Host -fore red $_}} –  Joey Sep 4 '09 at 11:42

Try this:

^(0|[1-9][0-9]?|1[0-7][0-9]|180)$
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This does not work for input of single digit, which I belive should be allowed. –  Stevo3000 Sep 4 '09 at 8:25
    
@Stevo3000: Fixed it. –  Gumbo Sep 4 '09 at 8:28
    
Neither for a triple 000. –  Ionuț G. Stan Sep 4 '09 at 8:29
    
@Ionut G. Stan: I think that’s just the alternative if matching just numbers with no leading zeros is too difficult. –  Gumbo Sep 4 '09 at 8:38

I would break down the ranges so that it can easily be specified in separate individual regex:

^(0|0[0-9][0-9]|1[0-7][0-9]|180)$

Or, what's the same in human readable terms:

0
000-099
100-179
180

If you need the two digit range, it's just a matter of adding [0-9][0-9] to the regex.

Also, if you are having trouble working with regex, try to specify them in a manner that makes the regex operators as clear as possible - usually there's a way to represent them in a way that makes their function much more clear, specially if the language you are doing this in allows you to separate portions of the regex specification into separate columns and lines..

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You forgot single digit 1 to 9. –  Robert L Sep 14 '09 at 11:19
    
No, I just read "0 or 000 to 180" and interpreted to mean: 0 as one digit, or the range 000 to 180 as three digits. When I said "If you need the two digit range..." I should have also mentioned the one digit range, so in regards to that you are correct. –  lcv Sep 15 '09 at 14:29

I modified Gumbo's:

^(00?0?|0?[1-9][0-9]?|1[0-7][0-9]|180)$

Try that.

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if you don't care about negative numbers

>> r = /\b(0?\d?\d|1[0-7]\d|180)\b/
=> /\b(0?\d?\d|1[0-7]\d|180)\b/
>> (0..200).map {|i| i.to_s =~ r }
=> [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil, nil]
>>
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You can use the below regular expression

^([0-1]?[0-7]?[0-9])|180$
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If you need it exactly three digits , You can remove ? signs –  Amjad Sham Feb 1 at 9:53

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