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In different places in the C++ (C++11) standard, declarations are described in terms of derived-declarator-type-list. I am studying rvalue references and the use of this term is critical in that context (§8.3.2):

In a declaration T D where D has either of the forms
    & attribute-specifier-seqopt D1
    && attribute-specifier-seqopt D1
and the type of the identifier in the declaration T D1 is “derived-declarator-type-list T,” then the type of the identifier of D is “derived-declarator-type-list reference to T.”

Unfortunately, the category "derived-declarator-type" is never defined in the standard. (I looked through every use of the word "derived", and in addition this is possibly confirmed here and here.)

Because "derived-declarator-type-list" is italicized, I assume it refers to a category, and not to a variable label such as T (and therefore, I disagree with Doug Gwyn's assessment in the second link I just gave that "we could have used X instead of 'derived-declarator-type-list' ").

What is the definition of derived-declarator-type in the C++11 standard?

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I don't have a convincing argument, but I interpret derived-declarator-type as referring to a set of English phrases like "pointer to" or "function with no arguments returning" used in the English description of a type. –  aschepler Dec 8 '12 at 16:22
    
I just posted a question and answer to further clear this up! –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 10 '12 at 20:55
    
Fabulous! That's excellent. –  Dan Nissenbaum Dec 10 '12 at 21:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It's being defined right there and then. It's a way of carrying whatever comes before T across to the next type, similar to:

<some stuff> T
<some stuff> reference to T

It's just whatever comes before T in the type of T D1.

For example, if you have the declaration int& (*const * p)[30], T is int, D is & (*const * p)[30] and D1 is (*const * p)[30]. The type of T D1 is "pointer to const pointer to array of 30 int". And so, according to the rule you quoted, the type of p is "pointer to const pointer to array of 30 reference to int".

Of course, this declaration is then disallowed by §3.4.2/5:

There shall be no references to references, no arrays of references, and no pointers to references.

I think the informal terminology of it being a derived declarator type list comes from the C standard's definition of a derived type (similar to a compound type in C++):

Any number of derived types can be constructed from the object, function, and incomplete types, as follows:

  • An array type [...]
  • An structure type [...]
  • An union type [...]
  • An function type [...]
  • An pointer type [...]

In response to the comments: It seems you're getting confused between the type and the declarator. For example, if int* p is the declarator, then the type of p is "pointer to int". The type is expressed as these English-like sentences.

Example 1: int *(&p)[30]

This is a declaration T D where (§8.3.1 Pointers):

  • T -> int
  • D -> *(&p)[3]

D has the form:

* attribute-specifier-seqopt cv-qualifier-seqopt D1

where D1 is (&p)[3]. That means T D1 is of the form int (&p)[3] which has type "reference to array of 3 int" (you work this out recursively, next step using §8.3.4 Arrays and so on). Everything before the int is the derived-declarator-type-list. So we can infer that p in our original declaration has type "reference to array of 3 pointer to int". Magic!

Example 2: float (*(*(&e)[10])())[5]

This is a declaration T D where (§8.3.4 Arrays):

  • T -> float
  • D -> (*(*(&e)[10])())[5]

D is of the form:

D1 [ constant-expressionopt ] attribute-specifier-seqopt

where D1 is (*(*(&e)[10])()). This means T D1 is of the form float (*(*(&e)[10])()) which has type "reference to array of 10 pointer to function of () returning pointer to float" (which you work out by applying §8.3/6 and then §8.3.1 Pointers and so on). Everything before the float is the derived-declarator-type-list. So we can infer that p in our original declaration has type "reference to array of 10 pointer to function of () returning pointer to array of 5 float". Magic again!

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Maybe. But it follows the notational convention of a grammatical category (italicized, dashes, "list"), and also the word "derived" is likely to represent something, if at least informally. –  Dan Nissenbaum Dec 8 '12 at 16:32
    
@DanNissenbaum Added an edit about the meaning of "derived" in this case. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 8 '12 at 16:40
    
This seems right on the money, thanks. There's one "loose link" for me: Given that, in your example, the type of T D1 is "pointer to const pointer to array of 30 int", in the next step this type is being decomposed into "derived-declarator-type-list T” (with the assumption that the latter T represents a different type), but it's not explained HOW to decompose this. It seems to me that another, equally valid decomposition, for example, is: derived-declarator-type-list is "pointer to const pointer" and the new T is "array of 30 int", resulting in something different. Any thoughts? –  Dan Nissenbaum Dec 8 '12 at 16:59
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@DanNissenbaum The T in "derived-declarator-type-list T" is the same as in T D1. The T in T D1 is defined in §8.3 as being the attribute-specifier-seq_opt decl-specifier-seq part of the declaration. Which, in this example I've given, is just int. Basically, the T is the part of a declaration that is shared amongst all declarators (e.g. int x, y, *z). –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 8 '12 at 17:01
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@DanNissenbaum I should have put some references in. This is not only looking at the §8.3.2 References, but all the other sections of §8.3. In fact, that example uses §8.3.1 Pointers, which allows T D where D has the form * D1. All of the sections of §8.3 are applied recursively to a declaration to determine the type. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 10 '12 at 12:37

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