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I got a simple question. I have a class, which I use for purpose of splitting a string in 2 years:

public class Period {

    int firstYear;
    int secondYear;

    Period () {

    }

    Period(String periode) {

        String [] periodeSplit = periode.split("-");
        this.firstYear = Integer.parseInt(periodeSplit[0]);
        this.secondYear = Integer.parseInt(periodeSplit[1]);
    }

    public String toString() {

        return  "Firstyear: " + this.firstYear + "\n" + "Secondyear: " + this.secondYear;
    }
}

I now want to extend this class, not splitting the data into 2 different ints but into 3 different ints. So besides the 2 already exisiting integer vars I want one extra. Whats the easiest way of doing this?

Your help is appreciated!

Kind regards,

Kipt Scriddy

share|improve this question
    
Do you understand how your code works? If so, I think you'd be able to answer your own question. –  David Pärsson Dec 8 '12 at 17:14
    
I am not really used to this kind of programming, Id rather use another class but for this assignment I need to do it. I am a bit confused by the fact that even if I extend the class with another int. What happens to the previous 2 ints. Will they be callable in this class? –  Kipt Scriddy Dec 8 '12 at 17:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think it would be better (and quite easy) the create more general class that will be able to deal with any number of years you pass to it:

public class Period {

    int[] years;

    Period() {

    }

    Period(String periode) {

        String[] periodeSplit = periode.split("-");
        years = new int[periodeSplit.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < periodeSplit.length; i++) {
            years[i] = Integer.parseInt(periodeSplit[i]);
        }
    }

    public String toString() {
        String result = "";
        for (int i = 0; i < years.length; i++) {
            result += "Year " + i + ":" + years[i] + "\n";
        }
        return result;
    }
}

If the original class really have to be extended than it can be done like this:

class ExtendedPeriod extends Period {
    int thirdPart;

    ExtendedPeriod(String periode) {
        String[] periodeSplit = periode.split("-");
        this.firstYear = Integer.parseInt(periodeSplit[0]);
        this.secondYear = Integer.parseInt(periodeSplit[1]);
        this.thirdPart = Integer.parseInt(periodeSplit[1]);
    }

    public String toString() {
        return "Day: " + this.firstYear + "\n" + "Month: " + this.secondYear
                + "\nYear: " + this.thirdPart;
    }
}

I would recommand to change variable names 'firstYear' and 'secondYear' to something different, like 'firstPart', 'secondPart' because for extendedPeriod they aren't years anymore (I left them in my code so it would compile with yours but called the new int 'thirdPart'). I don't feel that this is the best use of inheritance but if that's what's needed. I also wanted to reuse toString from Period like this:

public String toString2() {
        return super.toString() + "\nThird part: " + this.thirdPart;
    }

but for it to have sense you would have to chagne toString method in Period not to call values 'years'.

share|improve this answer
    
True, the thing is that I'm only interested in the splitting part. First data i am passing is a period of years so for instance: 1980-2020. The second data I am passing is a date: 17-10-1978. Besides that the teacher wants me to use an extended class :( –  Kipt Scriddy Dec 8 '12 at 17:26
1  
I've edited my response with a subclass. –  Kamil Dec 8 '12 at 17:46

When you extend the class, split it into two variables first, the one that's different from your current code, and then the one that your current code would handle.

Then simply call super(periode)

The child class will have access to the parent variables, since you made them default.

share|improve this answer
    
So when calling the extended class, in this case the Date class, i would pass the argument first to the Super(parent) class which parses the first 2 string and then pass it the child classe? –  Kipt Scriddy Dec 8 '12 at 17:24
    
no, split it up into what your child class would handle and what the parent class would handle, then call super(periode) on the string that parent class would handle. –  Lucas Dec 8 '12 at 17:26
    
So for instance if I pass a string to the super, super only has 2 vars that can be reached, is there a way to access the third splitted string in the super? So in short: passing something that can be split 3 times to the super and then fill a var in the child with the last splitted from the string. –  Kipt Scriddy Dec 8 '12 at 17:42
    
You can't use the child vars in the parent class unless you specify that all children of the parent must have that variable, which goes against what you're trying to do. You can however access the parent variables using super.firstyear;, or even calling super.toString() –  Lucas Dec 8 '12 at 17:50

I wouldn't extend to just add a new year.

Why not make the entire thing generic enough, so that it supports whatever split you need.

public class Period {

    String [] periodeSplit;


    Period(String periode) {

        periodeSplit = periode.split("-");

    }

    public String toString() {

       //TODO : Iterate and print.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I could do that. But given the fact that classes need a different toString method, ones are in fact years and the others are date's. So I would rather extend the one splitting the years and just override the toString method for the child class. –  Kipt Scriddy Dec 8 '12 at 17:21

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