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Is there a quick way I can covert any css color such as #ffe, whitesmoke, or hsl(20,50%,80%), to a rgb color like rgb(140,75,20)?

Can I use the .css() method on a variable to convert the color to rgb somehow?

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marked as duplicate by casperOne Apr 2 '13 at 15:58

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Check this answer : stackoverflow.com/a/5624139/1606729 –  koopajah Dec 8 '12 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

This may answer your question - RGB to Hex and Hex to RGB

function hexToRgb(hex) {
   var result = /^#?([a-f\d]{2})([a-f\d]{2})([a-f\d]{2})$/i.exec(hex);
   return result ? {
       r: parseInt(result[1], 16),
       g: parseInt(result[2], 16),
       b: parseInt(result[3], 16)
   } : null;
}

alert( hexToRgb("#0033ff").g ); // "51";
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Thanks! however I'm looking for a way to convert any CSS color, not just hex.. This is a step in the right direction though. –  Bennett Dec 8 '12 at 18:55
    
I've not seen an all-in-one before, so you may need to do some digging. Here's what I came across for HSL - stackoverflow.com/questions/11804027/…. –  JSess Dec 8 '12 at 19:09

No.

There is no quick way to convert, and you cannot use the ''.css()'' function for it. Colour names like ''whitesmoke'' have different hex values depending on your browser, so you also will not be able to convert them.

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If you call .css() with jQuery you can get the rgb(r,g,b) value back out of it. You probably can't really rely on this being consistent or for it to work everywhere, but it works well enough for many purposes. E.g. I can now use this to avoid building a color management scheme, and rely on the browser for quick-and-dirty friendly-UI color-coding purposes. –  Steven Lu Feb 8 at 19:04

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