Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My application, which turns given data into a tree representation, is using way too much memory. As it manages to turn around 200-300MB of memory into roughly 3GB before crashing.

I now want to figure out where the leak is, which part of the program causes that.

Therefore I do now wonder what the most common and efficient technique for memory-profiling in common-lisp, using sbcl is?

I already looked at (room) and (time) but its output is way to verbose, all I need is a wrapper which will say "After the execution the overall memory usage was +1000Byte", this would do the deal as I just want to know where the memory is used. Another criteria is that it has to work "on the fly" as the application will most likely crash, due to no remaining RAM.

Something looking like this:

(dotimes (i 4)
  (profiler-wrapper :messg "After execution memory ~a~%"  (execute-me i) ))

After execution memory +100Mb
After execution memory +100Mb
After execution memory +100Mb
After execution memory +100Mb
NIL
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I wrote my own version of such an macro, it is most likely not elegant and it does slow the code significantly due to (sb-ext:gc :full t) but it does give some perspective of the memory usage after the execution of a given body.

(defparameter *last-profile-step* 0)

(defmacro profile-it ((name gc-on) &body body)
    `(let ((*last-profile-step* ,(if gc-on
                     `(progn
                    (sb-ext:gc :full t)
                    (sb-kernel::dynamic-usage))
                     `(sb-kernel::dynamic-usage))))
       (unwind-protect 
        (progn
          ,@body)
     (progn
       (FORMAT t "After execution of ~a : ~a byte~%" ,name
           (- ,(if gc-on
               `(progn
                  (sb-ext:gc :full t)
                  (sb-kernel::dynamic-usage))
               `(sb-kernel::dynamic-usage))
              *last-profile-step* ))))))
share|improve this answer

Try the deterministic profiler, which is available in Slime through the slime-profile* commands or in the REPL. It does the wrapping for you and can report CPU and memory usage per function, at the expense of some overhead for the wrapping.

SBCL also comes with a statistical profiler that has less overhead and is more helpful if long-running processes need to be analysed and little or no prior information about the problem areas exist.

share|improve this answer
    
those wont work on the fly and are way to verbose for my purpose. –  Sim Dec 9 '12 at 11:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.