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preface: I would like to separate these problems into smaller questions, but apparently, I am missing some pieces of the puzzle and it seems impossible to me.

I developed my cherrypy application using cherrypy's built in WSGI server. I naively assumed that when the time comes, I will be able to use created WSGI Application class and deploy it using any WSGI compliant server.

I used this blog post to create my own (but very similar) cherrypy Plugin and Tool to connect to database using SQLAlchemy during http requests.

I expected that any server will somehow work like cherrypy's built in server:

  1. main process will spawn X threads to satisfy X concurrent requests
  2. my engine Plugin will create SQLalchemy engine with connection pool = X (so any request will have its connection)
  3. on request arrival, my Tool will supply sql alchemy connection from pool

This flow does not match with uWSGI (as long as I understand it).

I assign my application.py in uWSGI configuration. This file looks something like this:

cherrypy.tools.db = DbConnectorTool()
cherrypy.engine.dbengine = DbEnginePlugin(cherrypy.engine, settings.database)
cherrypy.config.update({
    'engine.dbengine.on': True
})

from myapp.application import Application
root = Application(settings)
application = cherrypy.Application(root, script_name='', config=settings)

I was using this application.py to mount my application into cherrypy's built in server when I was developing and testing it.

The problems are that uWSGI does not create any threads itself and my SQLAlchemy plugin is not working with it, because no cherrypy.engine is created.

Does uWSGI support threading in the meaning of using threads to serve multiple concurrent requests? Can I start these threads in my application.py? Will uWSGI understand it and use these threads for concurrent requests? And how can this be done? I think cherrypy can be used somehow, or not? And what about my SQLAlchemy Plugin, how can I start cherrypy.engine when using only WSGI cherrypy.Application?

Any help or information that could help me will be appreciated.

Edit:

My uWSGI configuration:

<uwsgi>
    <socket>127.0.0.1:9001</socket>
    <master/>
    <daemonize>/var/log/uwsgi/app.log</daemonize>
    <logdate/>
    <threads/>
    <pidfile>/home/web/uwsgi.pid</pidfile>
    <uid>uwsgi</uid>
    <gid>uwsgi</gid>
    <workers>2</workers>
    <harakiri>90</harakiri>
    <harakiri-verbose/>
    <home>/home/web/</home>
    <pythonpath>/home/web/instance</pythonpath>
    <module>core.application</module>
    <no-orphans/>
    <touch-reload>/home/web/uwsgi-reload-web</touch-reload>
</uwsgi>
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2 Answers 2

uWSGI uses worker processes, not threads. It's worth noting that it means that the globals are not shared between all requests any more. You can use SharedArea for global data. The processes are forked by default, so make sure you're ok with that or adjust settings (see Things to know).

Get Cherrypy's WSGI application with cherrypy.tree.mount(root, config=settings) call.

If your DB plugin does not have threading / shared data issues, chances are it will work. Like you say, you may need cherrypy.engine.start(), but definitely not cherrypy.engine.block(), since your main thread is now uWSGI worker.

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Essentially yes, I'd add that you can run with 1 worker and many threads. +1 though your answer gives more clues than confuses :) –  Prof. Falken Feb 5 '13 at 12:47
    
Technically you can, but due to GIL the performance will degrade, which defeats the purpose. –  jwalker Oct 2 '13 at 16:20

You should post your uWSGI config, otherwise it will be hard to understand what is going on.

By the way to spawn additional threads (per worker) you simply need to add --threads N

share|improve this answer
    
Hello, thank you for answer. I edited question and added my uWSGI configuration. –  JoshuaBoshi Dec 9 '12 at 9:43
    
<threads/> takes the number of threads to spawn as argument –  roberto Dec 9 '12 at 12:30

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