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My code is:

import java.util.*;

public class A {
public static void main(String[] args){
    List<String> list = new ArrayList();
    list.add("1"); //ok   line 1
    list.add(1); //error  line 2
}

When I run this code Java gives me an error and I know why, but even when I only use line 1 the compiler warns me. Why do I get this warning? I don't understand what is the difference between my first example and this code:

import java.util.*;

public class A {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>(); // <-- notice the second <String>
        list.add("1"); //ok   line 1
        list.add(1); //error  line 2
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When I run this code Java gives me an error and I know why, but even when I only use line 1 the compiler warns me. Why do I get this warning?

When you use your code, compiler will give you a warning like

List<String> list = new ArrayList();

ArrayList is a raw type. References to generic type ArrayList should be parameterized

It says that you have to provide a parameterized type for your ArrayList as well.

List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();

EDIT:

As sugguested by @newacct: if you are using Java 7, you could use empty angular brackets (<>) when instantiating your Collection like:

List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();

From the Java 7 documentation:

You can replace the type arguments required to invoke the constructor of a generic class with an empty set of type parameters (<>) as long as the compiler can infer the type arguments from the context.

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can the downvoter leave a comment ?? –  PermGenError Dec 8 '12 at 20:53
    
This is not the cause of the error, it's not about parameterizing the reference. –  MC Emperor Dec 8 '12 at 20:55
    
But i know that my question is that when i use List<String> list = new ArrayList(); compiler fail when i add other type but add string give warning me. Why warn me? Although i can not add other type? –  user1851725 Dec 8 '12 at 20:56
    
@MCEmperor OP says he knows why there is an error. check his question again. he wants to know the difference b/w his two code, check his first code is missing a parameterized type for arraylist, and the compiler warns in this case –  PermGenError Dec 8 '12 at 20:57
2  
or in Java 7 you can use List<String> list = new ArrayList<>(); –  newacct Dec 8 '12 at 21:18

This might help to understand the concept of generics: why use generics.

If you change your code as follows, there will be no errors and warnings:

import java.util.*;
public class A{

public static void main(String[] args){
    List<Object> list = new ArrayList<Object>();
    list.add("1"); //ok   code 1
    list.add(1); //error  code 2

}
}
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Code 2 won't compile because you cannot add an int (or Integer) to a list with Strings, but you already knew that.

Speaking of code 1, there can be several reasons that the compiler will warn you, depending on what compiler you are using and what settings that compiler is using. Here are some options:

  • In construction of parameterized objects, you must also specify the parameter. In this piece of code: List<String> list = new ArrayList(), the construction of the ArrayList object does not have a parameter, which is, on the other hand, given in the reference. The compiler suggests that you use List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>() instead.
  • You are using redundant type arguments. When using the code List<SomeType> list = new ArrayList<SomeType>();, you have twice specified that the parameter should be of type SomeType. The compiler suggests that you use the diamond inference (new ArrayList<>()). That suggestion is used since Java version 1.7.

I guess your compiler is warning you about the first option above. However, my compiler does not give any warnings when testing your code.

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I think OP knows why he's getting the error, i think the question is why does List<String> list = new ArrayList(); give an error and also not let him add any type into the list. anyhow, i must say, question is not really clear :) –  PermGenError Dec 8 '12 at 21:08

You have a List of type String so you cant put in Integers.

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