Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using SignalR to return a complex object graph to my JavaScript client. This object graph has multiple references throughout to the same object, so the JSON that SignalR/Json.NET returns looks a lot like this:

{
    "$id": "57",
    "Name": "_default",
    "User": {
        "$id": "58",
        "UserTag": "ken",
        "Sessions": [{
            "$id": "59",
            "SessionId": "0ca7474e-273c-4eb2-a0c1-1eba2f1a711c",
            "User": {
                "$ref": "58"
            },
            "Room": {
                "$ref": "57"
            }
        }],
    },

    "Sessions": [{
        "$ref": "59"
    }]
}

(Of course, a lot more complicated in real life, but you get the idea.)

And of course, when Json.NET is serializing by reference rather than by value, it assigns each object a $id value (e.g., "$id":"57", and then later just refers to that object using that id (e.g., "$ref":"57". And so far as I can tell, when it is Json.NET (using C#/.NET) that is deserializing those references, it places the appropriate instances of the object in the appropriate places.

All good so far - but what's the best way to deserialize these in JavaScript, so that I actually get the appropriate object instances in the appropriate places, instead of just weird $ref fields?

I could presumably write my own general-purpose deserializer, but I have to imagine that somebody else has already tackled this problem, and I'd just as soon not reinvent any wheels. Unfortunately, my Google skills apparently aren't sufficient to locate that solution :-).

Edit:

I see that there's an IETF draft proposal about how this sort of thing is supposed to work. And it looks like the always helpful Douglas Crockford has a tentative implementation of it. Unfortunately, the IETF proposal uses a different schema than Json.NET uses.

share|improve this question
1  
I am curious how would you de-serialize the object in your example, where it refers to itself ($id=57)? –  akonsu Dec 8 '12 at 21:56
    
That's part of the magic of a good deserializer :-). But yeah, it's figuring out those bits that I'd rather not do myself if somebody else has done all the hard work. –  Ken Smith Dec 8 '12 at 22:05
2  
my point is that if a deserializer replaces the references with actual objects then in your example you will get an object of infinite depth. –  akonsu Dec 8 '12 at 22:12
2  
It's only infinite if you insist on traversing it :-). In memory, it's just pointer A pointing at pointer B, which in turn points back to pointer A. If you're working with something like Microsoft's Entity Framework, you get stuff like that all the time, and it's not a problem. You just need to have a deserializer that knows how to deal with it. –  Ken Smith Dec 8 '12 at 22:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Well, I think this will do it. I modified Crockford's cycle.js to handle the reference format that Json.NET uses. And because TypeScript is an unspeakably better language than JavaScript, I rewrote it in TS. I certainly don't swear that it has no bugs (if anybody points them out, I'll try to fix 'em), but it seems to handle the complex object graphs I've throw at it so far.

export function retrocycle(obj: any): void {
    var catalog: any[] = [];
    catalogObject(obj, catalog);
    resolveReferences(obj, catalog);
}

function catalogObject(obj, catalog: any[]):void {

    // The catalogObject function walks recursively through an object graph
    // looking for $id properties. When it finds an object with that property, then
    // it adds it to the catalog under that key.

    var i: number;
    if (obj && typeof obj === 'object') {
        var id:string = obj.$id;
        if (typeof id === 'string') {
            catalog[id] = obj;
        }

        if (Object.prototype.toString.apply(obj) === '[object Array]') {
            for (i = 0; i < obj.length; i += 1) {
                catalogObject(obj[i], catalog);
            }
        } else {
            for (name in obj) {
                if (typeof obj[name] === 'object') {
                    catalogObject(obj[name], catalog);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

function resolveReferences(obj: any, catalog: any[]) {

    // The resolveReferences function walks recursively through the object looking for $ref
    // properties. When it finds one that has a value that is an id, then it
    // replaces the $ref object with a reference to the object that is found in the catalog under
    // that id.

    var i:number, item:any, name:string, id:string;

    if (obj && typeof obj === 'object') {
        if (Object.prototype.toString.apply(obj) === '[object Array]') {
            for (i = 0; i < obj.length; i += 1) {
                item = obj[i];
                if (item && typeof item === 'object') {
                    id = item.$ref;
                    if (typeof id === 'string') {
                        obj[i] = catalog[id];
                    } else {
                        resolveReferences(item, catalog);
                    }
                }
            }
        } else {
            for (name in obj) {
                if (typeof obj[name] === 'object') {
                    item = obj[name];
                    if (item) {
                        id = item.$ref;
                        if (typeof id === 'string') {
                            obj[name] = catalog[id];
                        } else {
                            resolveReferences(item, catalog);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

And the equivalent JS:

function retrocycle(obj) {
    var catalog = [];
    catalogObject(obj, catalog);
    resolveReferences(obj, catalog);
}

function catalogObject(obj, catalog) {
    var i;
    if (obj && typeof obj === 'object') {
        var id = obj.$id;
        if (typeof id === 'string') {
            catalog[id] = obj;
        }
        if (Object.prototype.toString.apply(obj) === '[object Array]') {
            for (i = 0; i < obj.length; i += 1) {
                catalogObject(obj[i], catalog);
            }
        } else {
            for (name in obj) {
                if (typeof obj[name] === 'object') {
                    catalogObject(obj[name], catalog);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

function resolveReferences(obj, catalog) {
    var i, item, name, id;
    if (obj && typeof obj === 'object') {
        if (Object.prototype.toString.apply(obj) === '[object Array]') {
            for (i = 0; i < obj.length; i += 1) {
                item = obj[i];
                if (item && typeof item === 'object') {
                    id = item.$ref;
                    if (typeof id === 'string') {
                        obj[i] = catalog[id];
                    } else {
                        resolveReferences(item, catalog);
                    }
                }
            }
        } else {
            for (name in obj) {
                if (typeof obj[name] === 'object') {
                    item = obj[name];
                    if (item) {
                        id = item.$ref;
                        if (typeof id === 'string') {
                            obj[name] = catalog[id];
                        } else {
                            resolveReferences(item, catalog);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

You use it kinda like so (assuming you've got SignalR hubs wired up):

$.connection.roomHub.server.joinRoom()
    .done(function(room) {
        retrocycle(room);
    });

I also created a quick-and-dirty little repository out on BitBucket for it: https://bitbucket.org/smithkl42/jsonnetdecycle.

share|improve this answer
2  
Just to make sure - for anyone finding this, use the code out on the BitBucket repo (bitbucket.org/smithkl42/jsonnetdecycle), rather than the code here. I've been maintaining and fixing bugs in that code, including a couple important ones having to do with correct handling of arrays. –  Ken Smith Feb 27 at 18:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.