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Here is an example. http://jsfiddle.net/52c7t/

Simply: I'm trying to get the div on the right side, to have a border like the div on the left. (I'd want the border to be on the left side of the right div)

I tried a million different combinations and haven't been able to do it. I was trying to avoid making an image and do this with css.

Thanks for your help!

UPDATE:

Image of what I mean. Sorry about my graphic design skills :P

http://i.imgur.com/pGSnL.png

HTML

<div id = "top_bar">
        <div  id="top_left_button" >border</div>
        <div  class = "trapezoid"> none </div>
</div>​

CSS

.trapezoid{
    vertical-align: middle;
    position:absolute;
    border-bottom: 60px solid blue;
    border-left: 45px solid transparent;
    border-top-left-radius:30px;
    *border-top-right-radius:15px;
    *border-bottom-right-radius:3px;
    height: 0;
    width: 50px;
    display: inline-block;
    right:1px;
}



#top_bar{
    background-color: #000;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #666;
    color: #222;
    position:fixed;
    left:0px;
    top: 0px;
    width:100%;
    overflow:hidden;
    height: 50%;
    font-weight: normal;
    white-space: nowrap;
    color: white;
    z-index:20; 
    line-height: 45px;
    min-width:320px;
    max-width: 320px;
    max-height:48px;
    border-radius: 5px;
    text-shadow: rgba(0,0,0,0.6) 0px -1px 0px; 
}

#top_bar:after {
    content: '';
    width: 10%;
    display: inline-block;
    font-size: 0;
    line-height: 0
}

#top_title, #top_left_button, #notifications, #top_right_button {
    color: white;
    height: 100%;
    overflow:hidden;
    display: inline-block;
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
#top_left_button,#top_right_button{
    width: 20%;
    background: rgba( 100, 255, 255, .1 );
}


#top_left_button{
    border-right: 2px solid #666;

}​

EDIT: UPDATED LINK

share|improve this question
    
I think having a mock-up image of what you need will also help, as there probably more markup than is needed in your current jsFiddle. Maybe not related, but these breadcrumb answers may also be useful here and here. –  arttronics Dec 8 '12 at 23:15
1  
Advice taken :) –  Emin Israfil Dec 8 '12 at 23:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The simple solution is to create another div since your blue div is already made up using the border property.

That new div is essentially a clone of the blue div, but will be colored red and made a little larger using the CSS width property. This becomes a pseudo border for the blue div.

Example of new div:

.trapezoid-border{
    vertical-align: middle;
    position:absolute;
    border-bottom: 60px solid red;        /* Color Changed will be pseudo-border color */
    border-left: 45px solid transparent;
    border-top-left-radius:30px;
    *border-top-right-radius:15px;
    *border-bottom-right-radius:3px;
    height: 0;
    width: 53px;                       /* Extra 3 pix when compared to .trapezoid class width */
    display: inline-block;
    right:1px;
}

jsFiddle DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Simple, clean and elegant solution. This is why I don't get paid the big bucks. Thanks! Small follow up, I plan on using this for a mobile site. From a performance perspective do you think a simple image would be better than all these transformations? –  Emin Israfil Dec 9 '12 at 0:18
    
If comparing CSS3 transforms to a simple image is done, the simple image would win as far as being cross-browser and mobile-browser friendly. Please thank me by accepting my Answer if this question is resolved. Cheers! –  arttronics Dec 9 '12 at 0:27
    
True, it is resolved. But I meant from a load time/memory-usage perspective. –  Emin Israfil Dec 9 '12 at 0:30
    
CSS3 transforms is more expensive than a simple image in any case. You can always create two webpages, one with a simple image and one with CSS3 transforms and then benchmark both webpages to see which one performs better. –  arttronics Dec 9 '12 at 0:52

Frankly, I think you should be using an image for this, but if you really want or have to avoid that, a somewhat dirty (though I think very convincing looking) fix would be to create a fixed sized red <div>, that you position and rotate (using the transform property) just right to achieve the appropriate effect.

.redborder {
    background-color:red; 
    width:3px;
    height:70px;
    transform:rotate(37deg);
    -ms-transform:rotate(37deg);
    -moz-transform:rotate(37deg);
    -webkit-transform:rotate(37deg);
    -o-transform:rotate(37deg);
    position:absolute;
    right:70px;
    top:-10px;
}

On jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/QBTpV/18/

(tested in Chrome and IE)

share|improve this answer
    
Why would an image be preferable? –  Emin Israfil Dec 9 '12 at 0:35
1  
It is partly a personal preference of mine to avoid hacky code, and there are many more subjective arguments to be made, like the notion that divs should not be used to only achieve graphical effects, but actually divide the page into logical parts, content-wise. –  amulware Dec 9 '12 at 1:05
1  
More objectively, some of the css properties used might not be as well supported as images. Also I suspect that html renderers are better optimised for drawing images, compared to weird divs like this, though one could argue, that at least today's PCs are more than fast enough that it does not make a difference. Though, I think that is a rather bad excuse for writing "bad code", and this does not even touch on the problems of everyone visiting your site on a mobile device loosing a few milliseconds of battery life. ;) –  amulware Dec 9 '12 at 1:12

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