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Let's say I have a mysql table called "Volunteers" which shows people who have signed up to work a specific time shift:

Volunteers 
==============
**UserId** int   
**StartTime** datetime    
**EndTime** datetime

Let's say that this table contains the following records:

(1, '2012-01-01 00:00:00', '2012-01-01 01:00:00')
(2, '2012-01-01 00:00:00', '2012-01-01 00:30:00')
(3, '2012-01-01 00:30:00', '2012-01-01 01:00:00')
(4, '2012-01-01 00:00:00', '2012-01-01 00:15:00')
(5, '2011-12-31 23:00:00', '2012-01-01 02:00:00')
(6, '2012-01-01 00:00:00', '2012-01-01 00:00:30')
(7, '2012-01-01 00:00:00', '2012-01-01 00:40:00') 
(8, '2012-01-01 00:20:00', '2012-01-01 01:00:00')

I would like to count all records from this table where users have signed up to work from 00:00:00 to 01:00:00 BUT ALSO include in this count timeshifts that can aggregate to this desired timeshift.

For example, using the example above, the ideal sql query would return 4.

Explanation:

User 1 has signed up to work the entire desired shift so this adds 1 to the count.

Users 2 and 3 have signed up to work timeshifts that aggregate to the desired timeshift so this adds 1 to the count.

User 4 has a timeshift that cannot aggregate with another user's timeshift to cover the desired timeshift so this does NOT add to the count.

User 5 covers the entire desired timeshift so this adds 1 to the count.

User 6 has a timeshift that can aggregate with user 8's timeshift to cover the desired time shift so this adds 1 to the count.

User 7 has a timeshift that can aggregate with user 8's timeshift to cover the desired timeshift BUT this should not be included in the count if user 8 has already aggregated with user 6 to produce the desired timeshift. Therefore, this is NOT added to the count.

Therefore, the count equals 4.

How would you go about doing this? Is this even possible?

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What is the maximum number of volunteers you would expect to make up an aggregate time shift? A generic solution that works for any number of volunteers making a shift would be difficult in SQL. –  Will A Dec 8 '12 at 23:03
    
Could you add these rows to your example data, and explain what the new result would be, please: (5, '2011-12-31 23:00', '2012-01-01 02:00:00'), (6, '2012-01-01 00:00:00', '2012-01-01 00:00:30'), (7, '2012-01-01 00:00:00', '2012-01-01 00:40:00'), (8, '2012-01-01 00:20:00', '2012-01-01 01:00:00') –  Laurence Dec 8 '12 at 23:28
    
@Laurence Okay, I just edited it to include your scenario –  nrtenn Dec 9 '12 at 1:29
    
@WillA Ideally, it would work with any number of volunteers, but the combinations must be distinct. In my example above, user 7 would not be included in the count if user 8 has aggregated with user 6. –  nrtenn Dec 9 '12 at 1:35
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't think your problem is suited well to be completely solved with SQL. Here's how I would solve it.

SELECT all the volunteers that overlap the shift you are interested in.

In your application layer (php/.NET/perl/whatever) you then apply this algorithm:

  1. Sort these intervals, and split them into subintervals so that they are all disjoint, or equal.

  2. Count the number of equal subintervals of each type.

  3. The minimum of this count is your answer.

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