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I'm writing a script in Bash to test some code. However, it seems silly to run the tests if compiling the code fails in the first place, in which case I'll just abort the tests.

Is there a way I can do this without wrapping the entire script inside of a while loop and using breaks? Something like a dun dun dun goto?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 89 down vote accepted

Try this statement:

exit 0

Replace 0 with appropriate error codes.

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25  
0 isn't good status to exit with if an error happens. –  Michał Górny Sep 4 '09 at 9:59
2  
You're right, edited for clarity. –  Michael Foukarakis Sep 4 '09 at 10:00
    
@MichałGórny what would be a good status code? –  CMCDragonkai May 14 at 2:39
2  
@CMCDragonkai, usually any non-zero code will work. If you don't need anything special, you can just use 1 consistently. If the script is meant to be run by another script, you may want to define your own set of status code with particular meaning. For example, 1 == tests failed, 2 == compilation failed. If the script is part of something else, you may need to adjust the codes to match the practices used there. For example, when part of test suite run by automake, the code 77 is used to mark a test skipped. –  Michał Górny May 14 at 8:00

Use set -e

#!/bin/bash

set -e

/bin/command-that-fails
/bin/command-that-fails2

The script will terminate after the first line that fails (returns nonzero exit code). In this case, command-that-fails2 will not run.

If you were to check the return status of every single command, your script would look like this:

#!/bin/bash

# I'm assuming you're using make

cd /project-dir
make
if [[ $? -ne 0 ]] ; then
    exit 1
fi

cd /project-dir2
make
if [[ $? -ne 0 ]] ; then
    exit 1
fi

With set -e it would look like:

#!/bin/bash

set -e

cd /project-dir
make

cd /project-dir2
make

Any command that fails will cause the entire script to fail and return an exit status you can check with $?. If your script is very long or you're building a lot of stuff it's going to get pretty ugly if you add return status checks everywhere.

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14  
+1 for being better than the accepted answer -- and probably the answer to the question the OP didn't know he can ask ;-) –  noamtm May 29 '12 at 14:11
1  
With set -e You still can make some commands exit with errors without stopping the script: command 2>&1 || echo $?. –  Adobe Nov 22 '12 at 10:53
1  
I think this will not catch errors if you have commands like (cd tmp && make) –  Tor Klingberg Feb 7 '13 at 11:34
2  
set -e will abort the script if a pipeline or command structure returns non-zero value. For example foo || bar will fail only if both foo and bar return non-zero value. Usually a well written bash script will work if you add set -e at the start and the addition works as an automated sanity check: abort the script if anything goes wrong. –  Mikko Rantalainen Aug 5 '13 at 12:04
4  
Actually the idiomatic code without set -e would be just make || exit $?. –  tripleee Sep 18 '13 at 19:35

A bad-arse SysOps guy once taught me the Three-Fingered Claw technique:

yell() { echo "$0: $*" >&2; }
die() { yell "$*"; exit 111; }
try() { "$@" || die "cannot $*"; }

These functions are *NIX OS and shell flavor-robust. Put them at the beginning of your script (bash or otherwise), try() your statement and code on.

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I often include a function called run() to handle errors. Every call I want to make is passed to this function so the entire script exits when a failure is hit. The advantage of this over the set -e solution is that the script doesn't exit silently when a line fails, and can tell you what the problem is. In the following example, the 3rd line is not executed because the script exits at the call to false.

function run() {
  cmd_output=$(eval $1)
  return_value=$?
  if [ $return_value != 0 ]; then
    echo "Command $1 failed"
    exit -1
  else
    echo "output: $cmd_output"
    echo "Command succeeded."
  fi
  return $return_value
}
run "date"
run "false"
run "date"
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Man, for some reason, I really like this answer. I recognize it's a bit more complicated, but it seems so useful. And given that I'm no bash expert, it leads me to believe that my logic is faulty, and there's something wrong with this methodology, otherwise, I feel others would have given it more praise. So, what's the problem with this function? Is there anything I should be looking out for here? –  dv310p3r Dec 20 at 16:06
    
I don't recall my reason for using eval, the function works fine with cmd_output=$($1) –  velotron Dec 21 at 23:12

Instead of if construct, you can leverage the short-circuit evaluation:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

echo $[1+1]
echo $[2/0]              # division by 0 but execution of script proceeds
echo $[3+1]
(echo $[4/0]) || exit $? # script halted with code 1 returned from `echo`
echo $[5+1]

Note the pair of parentheses which is necessary because of priority of alternation operator. $? is a special variable set to exit code of most recently called command.

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If you will invoke the script with source, you can use return <x> where <x> will be the script exit status (use a non-zero value for error or false). This will also work as expected, when you source the script. If you invoke an executable script (i.e., directly with its filename), the return statement will result in a complain (error message "return: can only `return' from a function or sourced script").

If exit <x> is used instead, when the script is invoked with source, it will result in exiting the shell that started the script, but an executable script will run directly fine.

To handle either case in the same script, you can use

return <x> 2> /dev/null || exit <x>

This will handle whichever invocation may be suitable.

Note: <x> is supposed to be just a number.

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