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I'm writing a script in Bash to test some code. However, it seems silly to run the tests if compiling the code fails in the first place, in which case I'll just abort the tests.

Is there a way I can do this without wrapping the entire script inside of a while loop and using breaks? Something like a dun dun dun goto?

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4 Answers

up vote 58 down vote accepted

Try this statement:

exit 0

Replace 0 with appropriate error codes.

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11  
0 isn't good status to exit with if an error happens. –  Michał Górny Sep 4 '09 at 9:59
2  
You're right, edited for clarity. –  Michael Foukarakis Sep 4 '09 at 10:00
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I often include a function called run() to handle errors. Every call I want to make is passed to this function so the entire script exits when a failure is hit. The advantage of this over the set -e solution is that the script doesn't exit silently when a line fails, and can tell you what the problem is. In the following example, the 3rd line is not executed because the script exits at the call to false.

function run() {
  cmd_output=$(eval $1)
  return_value=$?
  if [ $return_value != 0 ]; then
    echo "Command $1 failed"
    exit -1
  else
    echo "output: $cmd_output"
    echo "Command succeeded."
  fi
  return $return_value
}
run "date"
run "false"
run "date"
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Instead of if construct, you can leverage the short-circuit evaluation:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

echo $[1+1]
echo $[2/0]              # division by 0 but execution of script proceeds
echo $[3+1]
(echo $[4/0]) || exit $? # script halted with code 1 returned from `echo`
echo $[5+1]

Note the pair of parentheses which is necessary because of priority of alternation operator. $? is a special variable set to exit code of most recently called command.

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Use set -e

#!/bin/bash

set -e

/bin/command-that-fails
/bin/command-that-fails2

The script will terminate after the first line that fails (returns nonzero exit code). In this case, command-that-fails2 will not run.

If you were to check the return status of every single command, your script would look like this:

#!/bin/bash

# I'm assuming you're using make

cd /project-dir
make
if [[ $? -ne 0 ]] ; then
    exit 1
fi

cd /project-dir2
make
if [[ $? -ne 0 ]] ; then
    exit 1
fi

With set -e it would look like:

#!/bin/bash

set -e

cd /project-dir
make

cd /project-dir2
make

Any command that fails will cause the entire script to fail and return an exit status you can check with $?. If your script is very long or you're building a lot of stuff it's going to get pretty ugly if you add return status checks everywhere.

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6  
+1 for being better than the accepted answer -- and probably the answer to the question the OP didn't know he can ask ;-) –  noamtm May 29 '12 at 14:11
1  
With set -e You still can make some commands exit with errors without stopping the script: command 2>&1 || echo $?. –  Adobe Nov 22 '12 at 10:53
1  
I think this will not catch errors if you have commands like (cd tmp && make) –  Tor Klingberg Feb 7 '13 at 11:34
    
set -e will abort the script if a pipeline or command structure returns non-zero value. For example foo || bar will fail only if both foo and bar return non-zero value. Usually a well written bash script will work if you add set -e at the start and the addition works as an automated sanity check: abort the script if anything goes wrong. –  Mikko Rantalainen Aug 5 '13 at 12:04
1  
Actually the idiomatic code without set -e would be just make || exit $?. –  tripleee Sep 18 '13 at 19:35
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