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I know SO pals are not fans of "versus" questions but... even rephrasing the tittle a bit, the versus part is still there, so, why hide it.

Basically, I'd like to know when and why should I use a singleton or a static class, what can offer a singleton that a static class cant, and vice versa.

For a long time I used both, and I cant see a reason why I shouldn't use one over the other.

Thanks.

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1  
could you elaborate on "static class" construction, because "public static class" is not supported (yet) on AS3 as far as I know.. –  Yordan Yanakiev Dec 8 '12 at 23:41
1  
Sure, I meant, having a class with method and variables static. –  Artemix Dec 9 '12 at 1:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Both are basically global variables with caveats. Static classes prevent inheritance, and Singletons are ugly and add overhead with a property lookup. Both make automated testing difficult.

AS3 supports global variables, so why not use those?

Static:

package com.example
{
    public class Config
    {
        public static var VERSION:uint = 1;
    }
}

Singletons:

package com.example
{
    public class Config
    {
        public static var instance:Config = new Config();

        public var version:uint = 1;

        public function Config()
        {
            //Boiler plate preventing multiple instances
        }
    }
}

Global variable:

package com.example
{
    public var config:Config = new Config();
}
class Config
{
    public var version:uint = 1;
}

Now, let's say even though you only want a single instance of the class in your production app, you need multiple instances to write tests. You can make a public class Config, and use com.example.config = new Config() to reset. All the places that reference your global variable are now using the new instance, and you can even do fancy things like inheritence.

For example:

if(inDebugMode)
{
    com.example.config = new DebugConfig();
}
{
    com.example.config = new Config();
}
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1  
Global variables are the ultimate side-effect, error-prone and a pain to debug. They make your code rigid and fragile, because many of your classes will depend on the variables to be present at the same location at all times. Do not ever use them! Instead, consider dependency injection (e.g., via swiftsuspenders.org ), which wil also let you create "Singletons" that allow for inheritance and keep your classes nicely decoupled. –  weltraumpirat Dec 9 '12 at 9:55
1  
swiftsuspenders.org is very cool ! :) –  Yordan Yanakiev Dec 9 '12 at 10:33
    
I agree that global state is bad in general, but I think global variables are better than dependency injection for things like loggers or utilities. –  Sean Fujiwara Dec 9 '12 at 12:38
1  
Global variables are never better than anything. Putting your logger in a global may seem easier and less code to write, but it also creates a rigid dependency, throughout your entire code base, no less. Use an ILogger interface, inject the implementation - you can then exchange your logger at any time by modifying your configuration, and without having to recompile all your libraries. –  weltraumpirat Dec 9 '12 at 15:35
2  
You can do that with a global variable, as the last part of my answer shows. Injecting ILogger into every class is not very elegant or readable. –  Sean Fujiwara Dec 10 '12 at 0:04

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