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I want to make a singleton class which extends DBI. should I be doing something like this:

use base 'Class::Singleton';
our @ISA = ('DBI');

or this:

our @ISA = ('Class::Singleton', 'DBI');

or something else?

Not really sure what the difference between 'use base' and 'isa' is.

Thanks.

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1  
Well, the base.pm documentation tells you the difference. –  brian d foy Sep 4 '09 at 16:33

4 Answers 4

The typical use of @ISA is

package Foo;

require Bar;
our @ISA = qw/Bar/;

The base and parent pragmas both load the requested class and modify @ISA to include it:

package Foo;

use base qw/Bar/;

If you want multiple inheritance, you can supply more than one module to base or parent:

package Foo;

use parent qw/Bar Baz/; #@ISA is now ("Bar", "Baz");

The parent pragma is new as of Perl 5.10.1, but it is installable from CPAN if you have an older version of Perl. It was created because the base pragma had become difficult to maintain due to "cruft that had accumulated in it." You should not see a difference in the basic use between the two.

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I think you should use the parent pragma instead of base as has been suggested in perldoc base.

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1  
Is 'parent' new in 5.10? It must be, as it's not in my 5.8 documentation. –  Ether Sep 4 '09 at 16:56
    
I am not sure. However, quoting Chas's statement: "... The parent pragma is new as of Perl 5.10.1, but it is installable from CPAN if you have an older version of Perl. ..." –  Alan Haggai Alavi Sep 4 '09 at 17:11

from base's perldoc...

package Baz;

use base qw( Foo Bar );

is essentially equivalent to

package Baz;

BEGIN {
   require Foo;
   require Bar;
   push @ISA, qw(Foo Bar);
}

Personally, I use base.

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1  
The latest base.pm tells people to use parent, which is in 5.10.1. :) –  brian d foy Sep 4 '09 at 16:32

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