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Is there a good reason to use parameters that shadow fields? What is the difference between these two:

public class Point {
    public int x = 0;
    public int y = 0;

    //constructor
    public Point(int a, int b) {
        x = a;
        y = b;
    }
}

and

public class Point {
    public int x = 0;
    public int y = 0;

    //constructor
    public Point(int x, int y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }
}

And what if you use the this keyword without parameters that shadow fields in this example (I'm guessing it's just unnecessary):

public class Point {
    public int x = 0;
    public int y = 0;

    //constructor
    public Point(int a, int b) {
        this.x = a;
        this.y = b;
    }
}
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think it is a style issue, but especially for public fields - Point(int x,int y) is self documenting itself, while Point(int a, int b) doesn't

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2  
And even if the fields are not public, they're often exposed by the public API of the class (getters, setters, methods), or part of the state of the object as described in the class javadoc. Using consistent names really helps. – JB Nizet Dec 9 '12 at 0:24

In the second case, it is obvious that x and y have one purpose, though stored in two places. If you see a, b, x and y it's not obvious what the relationship between them is.

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The difference is readability and what an IDE will show you.

IMO parameters should be named as descriptively as possible so the IDE and Javadocs are as communicative and expressive as possible.

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There is also an issue of harder to detect bugs.

using x instead of this.x in a constructor is a potential source of bugs.

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