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I'm looking at the last 10 or so pushes, and I would like to back out 4 of them (unconsecutive).

How can I do this?

In SVN, it would be a matter of reverting the changes and pushing the "undone" changes back in. Not sure how to do it in Git.

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A search for "git revert" wasn't sufficient? –  Andrew Marshall Dec 9 '12 at 1:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You use git revert <commit> to revert the offending commits without rewriting history. This creates a new commit that undoes these commits.

Instead of <commit> you use the SHA of each commit you want to revert.

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Ultimately, this turned out to be best option. Tried "interactive rebase" but I had to do a lot more merging. Reverting the "bad" checkins turned out to be easiest. Realized that after merging, one has to add/commit/push the resolved file if there were conflicts. –  amit Dec 16 '12 at 10:22

@ThiefMaster's answer works great.

As an alternative, if it's not a shared remote branch (meaning if no one else has pulled your changes) you could git rebase -i HEAD~10. This will open a list of the last 10 commits in your $EDITOR. Just delete the commits you no longer want, save the file, and git push -f to force push and overwrite the history on the remote branch.

Advantage: it's leaves the history cleaner.

Disadvantage: you might not want the history cleaned up and could desire having the revert commits captured in the git history.

More on interactive rebasing here: http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Tools-Rewriting-History#Changing-Multiple-Commit-Messages

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I'd only do this as a last resort, since everyone else will need to rebase as a result. –  Eric Walker Dec 9 '12 at 5:17
    
Others would have to git pull -f. But yes, of course if it's a shared remote branch this is a luke warm idea. I thought I made that clear in the above that this was an alternative only to be done if it's not shared but I'll highlight that in bold. Advantage: it's leaves the history cleaner. Disadvantage: you might not want the history cleaned up and could desire having the revert commits captured in the git history. And again, the making all other devs do a force pull is a disadvantage. –  Steve McKinney Dec 9 '12 at 13:28
    
The clarification of the pros and cons in the context of the other answer makes this option a helpful one, and there's less risk that the user will fall into a trap. –  Eric Walker Dec 9 '12 at 16:45

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