Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to resize an array by adding the array size by 1 per method invoke.
I have created a static method and it takes array as its argument.

public static void addArray(int arrayName[]) {
    int tempNum[] = new int[arrayName.length]; // save the numbers before add array size
    for (int i = 0; i < arrayName.length; i++) { // because by adding/removing array size, it would clear element array
        tempNum[i] = arrayName[i];
    }
    arrayName = new int[arrayName.length + 1]; // adds array size by 1
    for (int i = 0; i < arrayName.length - 1; i++) { // sets all the saved numbers to the new element in the array
        arrayName[i] = tempNum[i];   // stops at (length - 1) because I want to leave it blank at the last element
    }
}

(sorry if the code is messed up, I don't know how to properly post code in here)

In the main, I do this;

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int num[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};

    addArray(num);

    System.out.println(num.length);  
}

As you can see, the default array size (length) should be 5, but no matter how many times I invoke the method, it always print as 5.
Now I'm starting to think that static method does not allow the array from main to be resized ?
If it can't, do you have another way to resize an array by specifically using static method only ?

share|improve this question
6  
Java reference values don't work the way you think they do. –  Dave Newton Dec 9 '12 at 2:36
    
But, you can modify the reference values via static method when having the name of the array element as its argument. For example: public static void Modify(int a[]). If we edit the a[number], it would affect the main values. –  e-zard Yusof Dec 9 '12 at 2:47
    
You can modify the object that the reference points to - but you cannot change TO WHAT the reference points at the caller, as the reference is copied when passed as an argument. –  Pyranja Dec 9 '12 at 2:51
    
And you just figured out that Java is call-by-value :) –  Brian Roach Dec 9 '12 at 3:32

2 Answers 2

You need to return the array from the function:

public static int[] addArray(int arrayName[]) {
    ...
    arrayName = new int[arrayName.length + 1]; // adds array size by 1
    ...
    return arrayName;
}


public static void main(String[] args) {
    int num[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};
    num = addArray(num);
    System.out.println(num.length);  
}
share|improve this answer

You can simply do this:

int num[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};
num = Arrays.copyOf(num, num.length + 1);
System.out.println(num.length);

This should then print 6.

The issue with your code is that when you call a method, the method receives a copy of the reference. Thus, the method cannot change what object is referenced by the variable in the calling method.

Another approach is to make num a static field::

static int num[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4};
public static void main(String[] args) {

    addArray(); // or use Arrays.copyOf() as above

    System.out.println(num.length);  
}

public static void addArray() {
    int tempNum[] = new int[num.length + 1];
    System.arraycopy(num, 0, tempNum, 0, num.length);
    num = tempNum;
}

What you can't do (without complex reflection code) is pass a variable name to the method and have it change the length of an array with that name.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems I learned new things :). By making the variable static, I can relate with the static method, LOL. I can do this fine with Class, I just want to do with static method, thanks :), yeah SOLVED. Also, what does this do ? System.arraycopy(num, 0, tempNum, 0, num.length); Can you tell what does each argument does (or refer to) ? –  e-zard Yusof Dec 9 '12 at 3:11
1  
@e-zardYusof The arraycopy method copies contents of num to tempNum. 1st argument - original array, 2nd argument - starting index of original array, 3rd argument - destination array, 4th argument - starting index of destination array, 5th argument - number of elements to be copied from original to destination array Refer this: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/…, int, java.lang.Object, int, int) –  Robin Chander Dec 9 '12 at 3:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.